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Archive for the ‘Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland’ Category

The Maunder Taylor Family’s Excellent Adventure

Posted by Jody on May 17, 2014

The Coastal Path is one of my very favorite blogs. It chronicles the explorations and light-hearted shenanigans of the Maunder Taylor family as they travel on foot along the coast of Britain. I like it partly because Greg and I hope to hike Britain’s seaside trails in the not-too-distant future. But mostly I enjoy reading The Coastal Path because it’s just plain fun to tag along with this close-knit wayfaring clan on their frequent coastal jaunts. 

Recently, I asked Nic (Dad and blogger) for his tips on undertaking a walk around the coast of Britain. I was thrilled when not only he, but each one of his family members, chimed in with their own witty words of advice!

 Today’s Featured Guest Writers are Nic, Deb, Ben, and Catherine Maunder Taylor!

The  Maunder Taylor at Boscombe

The Maunder Taylor Family at Boscombe

Nic told me that he first had the idea of walking the coast of Britain 20 years ago but didn’t act on it. He went on to make a career, eventually joined the family business, and settled down into a life of working during the week. He then spent his weekends “half waiting for the week to start again.” 

      After about 10 years of this I turned 40 and had what I call a “healthy mid-life wobble”. It wasn’t a crisis by any means – just an appropriately timed self-correction.  For some reason (I have no idea why) I declared I wanted to go to Southend Pier on my birthday. We went on some rides (I went upside down on a roller coaster for the first time since I was 15) and took a walk up the pier.  We went on a tall ship that happened to be moored at there and had coffee. I remembered the dream I’d had when I was younger.

     For a couple of months I thought quietly about things and then suggested it to my wife. She thought I was quite bonkers and preferred the “one step at a time” approach, agreeing to do a walk if I could convince the kids. Convince the kids?!?!?  That was EASY!

     “Hey you two!” I shouted, “If you come for a walk with us we’ll do ice cream and roller coasters at Southend!”

     “Yay!” they shouted!

     Oh, my poor children! Little did they realise what they were saying yes to!

Beachcombing on the British Coast

Beachcombing on the British Coast

How do you get a family of four to walk around the coast of Britain?  This is one of the toughest exercises known to humankind.  It is no mistake that DHL offers no such service within their menu of logistical offerings.

What follows are the informed views of four people who, most weekends, do exactly this:

Nic (Aged 42) –  Equipment stockman, driver and mule, carrying anything and everything put into his backpack by anyone and everyone else.

Deb (Aged 42) – The person most likely to put anything and everything into Nic’s backpack.  The person most likely to insist we return home 10 minutes after setting out because she left something out.

Ben (Aged 11) – The person most likely to complain that out of everything put in his father’s backpack, including the thing that they just turned round and went home for, none of them have screens and none of them connect to the internet.

Catherine (Aged 11) – The person most likely to think that if everything was taken back out of the backpack, there might be enough room for her.

Nic - Map Reading at Botany Bay

Nic – Map Reading at Botany Bay

Nic’s Advice for Fellow Fathers (in no particular order):

1. Just do it. There is never a right time to start. Don’t think. Do. Get on with it or you will never start.

2. Ignore the remonstrations of your children. Once they actually get to the coast they have fun. Persuading them to go down there in the first place, however, is a weekly task. When they ask how far you are going to walk each weekend, think of a number and double it. Stick to the answer without any hint of humour.

3. Walkie-talkies – these were an idea of a friend of mine and they are worth their weight in gold. They give the kids a new lease of life after 10 miles or so. You occasionally pick up other random conversations between persons unknown and get to interject with complete anonymity. The kids absolutely love that. Especially when it’s the police.

4. Have a checklist of things you need to take with you. I never make a checklist and every week I regret it.

5. Buy a big backpack. Your wife will fill it. From skiing jackets in mid-summer to swimming trunks in the deep winter, it can all end up in there. It is best to just accept what is put in and get on with it.

6. Remember to take last week’s packed lunch remains out of your backpack when you get home at the end of the walk. Especially if they include banana skins.

Deb at Hythe Beach

Deb at Hythe Beach

 Deb’s Advice for Mindful Mothers

1. Put the cat out! We have to go back because I have left something in, not out!

2. Leave dry socks back at the car. Kids. Sea. Regardless of weather. Enough said.

3. Food. The night before. The morning of the walk. The mid morning of the walk. The lunchtime of the walk. The mid-afternoon snack of the walk. You get the idea. But no bananas – see husband’s rule no. 6 above.

4. We plan our route, view it on Google Earth, and if it looks being anything other than ‘get to the beach, turn right and keep walking’, we look at other bloggers who have done the walk and see what they did. And we still get lost. Just like they did.

5. Never pass a loo. You never know when you will see one again.

6. Ditto ice cream vans.

Catherine at Sandwich Bay

Catherine at Sandwich Bay

Catherine’s Advice for Dutiful Daughters

1. My first tip would be always help your mum make your sandwiches or she might leave something out (hopefully by accident – salad).

2. Always put your own clothes out because my mum has always put winter clothes out when it’s sunny.  I’m normally too hot or too cold which is not nice when you have to walk 15 miles then wait for a taxi.

3. I sometimes do a check list the night before because you can’t leave all your stuff with your parents to sort out and there is always something we need to go back for.

4. Bring a camera for your own pictures because there might be something you want to take a picture of but your dad doesn’t.

5. I prefer sports socks than walking socks because the walking socks are just too itchy to wear for a whole day.

Ben "doing what he does best!"

Ben “doing what he does best!”

Ben’s Advice for Surly Sons

1. Get woken up by mum when I’m really tired.

2. Drink and eat anything I get cuz I get really hungry.

3. Try not to throw up in the car (listening to Capital FM works well for me).

4. If I can’t listen to Capital then I bring my MP3 player.

5. Stuff myself at breakfast cuz I get hungry.

Hope Gap (Seven Sisters cliffs in the background)

The Maunder Taylor Family at Hope Gap (Seven Sisters cliffs in the background)

~~ There you have it! Big backpack; big breakfast; go! Good luck – only 7,000 miles to cover! ~~

My sincerest thanks to Nic, Deb, Ben, and Catherine for sharing their time, tips, photos, and fun with us! You too can join them on their excellent adventure at The Coastal Path: One family’s walk around the coast of Britain. ~Jody

Happy wayfaring!

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Posted in Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland, Featured Guest Writer, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , , , | 8 Comments »

Using What You Find: Beachcombing Art!

Posted by Jody on March 12, 2014

Today’s Featured Guest Writer is Beachcombing Artist Richard Blacklaw-Jones.

About the Author/Artist: Richard is an international beachcombing artist!  He uses what he finds on the beach to make pictures or useful and decorative items. He lives in Pembrokeshire, Wales, and therefore has the great good fortune to be surrounded by beaches that face the Atlantic and the Gulf Stream. Due to this happy circumstance, he can always find materials for his work. He prefers to use man-made materials, and he says, “even if my work doesn’t sell I can comfort myself with the fact that the beach is a little cleaner following my efforts.” He has pursued this calling for 15 years and has exhibited his works in Wales, England, and France.

"My favourite Pembrokeshire beach" Photo taken 3/11/2014

My Favorite Pembrokeshire Beach

We are looking West, out over the Milford Haven from the North side of the Haven. That’s the town of Milford Haven in the distance, and it’s suburbia in the top right of photo. It doesn’t really have a name, this beach, but it is endlessly fascinating because of its industrial history (it was a boat breaking yard amongst other things) as well as for what washes up. It’s at about half tide in the photo, and you can see the “beach” consists mostly of the remains of some factories which were basically demolished and bulldozed onto the beach in the 1960’s. Even better, in the lower right foreground, you can see two timbers sticking out of the back wall of the beach. These timbers used to support a wooden sea facing wall whose maintenance ceased when the factories went and has consequently rotted away, thus allowing the made up ground behind it to erode onto the beach. This gives a constant supply of mixed domestic and industrial refuse from the late Victorian era to the waves and for me to find and use.

~ Using What You Find ~

I belong to a group of artists who annually organise a large group exhibition at St David’s Cathedral with (at the same time) smaller exhibitions at a number of picturesque, small churches, all of the above in Pembrokeshire, Wales. The exhibitions run under the name Art on the Faith Trail, and our logo is the footprint (referencing the ancient practice of pilgrimage to St David’s Cathedral) which brings me to the picture below.

This is a very big chunk of black plastic, about 4 feet on each side and almost 2 inches thick. The big bolts threaded through it imply it was fixed to something and maybe acted as a hatch cover? It had been in the sea long enough to have some quite large barnacles growing in the bolt holes. This piece washed up at a beach near Milford Haven.

I’ve been looking for something of this sort for quite a while as I need to make some signs for use outside the exhibition venues. I decided to cut two foot-shapes from this.

Using What You Find

Using What You Find

Having cut one of the feet (with a jig-saw), here it is laid on the other half of the slab so that I may trace around it so that I will have a pattern to follow with the jig saw.

Next the jig-saw

Ready for the Jig Saw

Here are the two feet completely cut out. This took most of a day to do as the jig saw blade would get hot when cutting the tighter curves around the toes or heels and would then start to bind in its cut. The only answer was to let the blade cool for some time and only cut short lengths. Such repeated heating and cooling is probably responsible for one jig saw blade breaking and thus adding to the job’s duration when I had to take time to replace it.

The idea is to have one foot standing upright outside a venue so that passers by will see it and come inside. A plastic foot nearly 4 ft tall should attract attention, and I’m going to cut some multiple-coloured plastic letters and attach them to each foot, if possible to spell out “Art on The Faith Trail. ” I say if possible because the width of each foot will determine the size of the letters.

Both Feet

Both Feet

Here’s how I worked the words into the space offered. Now to cut them out.

Template

Template

I then turn to the bucket of scraps and start sorting out what colours I’ve got.

Bucket of Scraps

Beachcombed Scraps

The first two words. I can see it will look very nice and I'm encouraged to press on.

The first three words. “I can see it will look very nice and I’m encouraged to press on.”

Fourth word, third line. Still good.

“Fourth word, third line. Still good.”

All set up, and doesn’t it look fine! I’m very happy with this and feel sure it will catch the attention of passers by. I hope it will prompt curiosity in the viewer to “see what the show is like, as the sign’s pretty good.”

A good evening's work.

“A good evening’s work.”

Completed Signs

Beachcombing Art !

Richard’s online gallery is a veritable feast for the beachcomber’s eyes !

You’ll want to check out more of his imaginative and diverse artwork, beachcombing blog, course offerings, and fun “stuff” at Beachcombing Art!

~~~

A note from our treasure hunters:

We simply love to share when it comes to beaches, treasure hunting, beachcombing crafts, and beachy tips. How about you? Do you have a favorite beach you’d like to share with us? Maybe you have some great tips for beach picnics, seaside safety, or seashore activities. Please check out our Submission Guidelines for info on jumping into the fun at Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches. It would be wonderful if you would join us as our next Featured Guest Writer!

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland, Beachy Keen Art, Featured Guest Writer | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 12 Comments »

63c – Hayling Island Part III

Posted by Jody on February 1, 2014

Jody:

It’s all about the negative ions! ;-)

Originally posted on The Coastal Path:

How can I explain how pleased we were to be back at the coast?  By submitting the photographic evidence!

The minute we arrived back at the coast Ben and Catherine, who are exceptionally good at arguing when they want to, started interacting on an entirely friendly basis.  Wow!  As I watched this rare moment of harmony a small judder of sheer pleasure passed through my body.  It shot up into the clear blue sky like a firework as my two children engaged in happy discourse.

Happy Discourse at Sandy Point BeachWe quickly reached the groynes that lined the southern shores.  Their bases were piled high with mini mountains of riprap.  Instead of trudging around saltings and mudflats we were able to climb these massive boulders to reach giddy heights of celebration as we surveyed our beloved coastal landscape that spread itself out below us.

Rip Rap at Hayling Island

Whilst Ben and I scaled the island’s rocky heights, Deb and Catherine…

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Posted in Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Christmas and New Year beachcombing

Posted by Jody on February 1, 2014

Jody:

I simply cannot wait to see what Alex does with these beauties!
She’s so very talented. Have a look. I’m sure you’ll agree!

Originally posted on Under A Topaz Sky:

A trip to Suffolk would not be complete these days without a visit to Southwold Pier and a nice comb along the beach. As I’ve said before, the massive loss of coastline north of Southwold makes the beach a wonderful spot for sea glass and other bits and pieces. We went on my birthday (Christmas Eve) and although it was bitterly cold and the tide was coming in, I still managed a bit of a trawl through the shingle and came away happy with these little beauties.

Beachcombing Southwold 12.13 a

I can’t resist a nice ring pull and my husband spotted the wonderfully soft, fuzzy piece of pottery. But this was the prize, the bottom of a slender glass bottle.

Beachcombing Southwold 12.13 b

I’m sure, looking at the diameter and also that the glass rises straight from the base, that it’s old. It certainly looks like some bottles I have from Victorian dumps.  Southwold never disappoints!

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Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Forgotten Cornwall

Posted by Jody on September 23, 2013

Today’s Featured Guest Writer is Ruth Mitchell.

On the South East tip of Cornwall, just across the Devon, Cornwall border, you will find what is affectionately known as Cornwall’s Forgotten Corner. Whitsand Bay is a four mile stretch of white sand (when the tide is out) starting from Rame Head in the East and finishing at Portwrinkle, although on clear days you can see all the way down the coastline as far as the Lizard. It’s a fantastic holiday spot for families as it really harks back to a time when there was nothing but good old seaside fun, rockpools to play in, soft rolling waves for swimming and at low tide miles of sand for those castles. When the tide comes in, it creates lots of small coves where you can stay and barbeque your supper and watch the amazing sunsets.

Cornwall's Forgotten Corner by Ruth Mitchell

Cornwall’s Forgotten Corner by Ruth Mitchell

The bay has three old fortifications, one is still used by the Ministry of Defence and towers over the beach like a fairytale castle, another is now a wedding venue with awesome views and the last, a holiday village with chalets and camping. Beyond Rame Head are the small smugglers villages of Kingsand and Cawsand, Whitsand was a prime location to land the cargo, as it was so cut off. Today divers can explore two local wrecks that are in the bay the HMS Scylla and the James Egan Layne and with a golf course on the cliffs at Portwrinkle there really is something for everyone here on the forgotten corner.

About the Author: Sea Field View is a chalet that belongs to me, Ruth Mitchell, Performer and Theatre Maker. When my partner got a job at the Theatre Royal Plymouth, we moved down to the South West and bought the chalet three years ago. My blog tells people about life on a Cornish Cliff. As well as using it for ourselves, which we love, we sometimes rent it out as a holiday let, here is the link which tells you all about it. Sea Field View

~~~

A note from our treasure hunters:

We simply love to share when it comes to beaches, treasure hunting, beachcombing crafts, and beachy tips. How about you? Do you have a favorite beach you’d like to share with us? Maybe you have some great tips for beach picnics, seaside safety, or seashore activities. Please check out our Submission Guidelines for info on jumping into the fun at Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches.  You may be our next Featured Guest Writer!

Posted in Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland, Featured Guest Writer, Tide Pools | Tagged: , , , | 7 Comments »

Silverknowes Beach on the Firth of Forth

Posted by Jody on September 10, 2013

Today’s Featured Guest Writer is “imagineer.”

Silverknowes is one of the many beaches on the Firth of Forth and is just north of Edinburgh in Scotland. Sunny days at Silverknowes are to be treasured so I took a short trip to enjoy the fantastic views.

Cramond

Cramond

The is a view from the Cramond end of the beach and shows one of the many islands in the River Forth. This one can be accessed when the tide is out but people are frequently caught out by the speed of the returning tide and have to be rescued. In the distance is Fife, the other side of the Firth of Forth. The river is used by all sorts of ships, from cruise liners to submarines. It was a very industrialised river but today sea life is recovering and the legacy of industrial pollution is in the past.

Whale Rescue

Whale Rescue

The beach can be busy but today was a very unusual day because there was a whale rescue in progress and a crowd gathered to watch. There are all sorts of animals and birds that live in and pass through the Forth. The beach starts at Cramond where the River Almond meets the Forth. There are lots of walks from the Cramond end and it has a café for refreshments when you return. The beach is approximately one mile long but there are other paths that can be taken into Edinburgh if you want to venture farther.

Dog Play

Dog Play

Dogs love to play in the water even though they go home covered in sand and salt water. I think the dogs enjoy the beach even more than the people. I took a few pictures of this pair as they were such fun to watch and put them on my blog:  “Happiness Is Dog Shaped.”

Holding On

Holding On

The rescue party stood for hours in the cold water helping the whale breathe. At least the rescuers could see the beautiful scenery all around. The beach extends to the island when the tide is out, but when you reach the island the water becomes very deep.

Night

Night

I’ve included this shot to show how the same location looks at night time.

***
~Please visit Featured Guest Writer “imagineer” at imaginations /caught by the eye of mankind.~

A note from our treasure hunters:

We simply love to share when it comes to beaches, treasure hunting, beachcombing crafts, and beachy tips. How about you? Do you have a favorite beach you’d like to share with us? Maybe you have some great tips for beach picnics, seaside safety, or seashore activities. Please check out our Submission Guidelines for info on jumping into the fun at Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches.  You may be our next Featured Guest Writer!

Posted in Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland, Featured Guest Writer, Whales and Dolphins | Tagged: , , , , , , | 9 Comments »

52c – Brighton Part IV

Posted by Jody on June 17, 2013

Jody:

This is one of our favorite beach blogs: The Coastal Path ~ One family’s walk around the coast of Britain. This week the family is touring the Brighton Pier and Brighton’s fabulous shingle beach (a beach which is formed of pebbles). By the way, don’t even think about collecting those beach pebbles! Brighton’s Seafront Officer once told me: We do not allow stone collections from the beach unfortunately. This is because we need to maintain the level of shingle on the beach to assist with coastal defence, so for this reason it is not permitted.

 ~ Oh well, there are plenty of other beaches to comb!

~~~

You can read our family’s very own Brighton Beach memoir here: Brighton ~ A Top 10 British Memory.

~~~

Originally posted on The Coastal Path:

We left the Brighton Wheel and headed off up the pier for the rides.  Brighton Pier started off life as the Palace Pier, built in 1823 to service passenger ships arriving from Dieppe.  Over the years it grew and grew into the attraction it is today.  I was quite astonished to find that over its long history it has not once been destroyed by fire, flood, or fractious young fellows with far-fetched foibles (ie kids with matches).  Compared to many of its brethren, Brighton Pier has fared well over the years.

Brighton Pier

As we walked up there were good views back to the east.

View Back East from Brighton PierWhat we were really looking for, however, were the rides.  My wife and aunt decided they were far too mature for such juvenile delights and left the kids and I to our childishness.  It was quite fun, really…

Wild River with insert…although some of us got a little wet…

Wild RiverThe…

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Posted in Amusement Piers, Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland, Monday Miscellaneous, Sand and Shoreline | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

Seaham sea glass

Posted by Jody on June 3, 2013

Jody:

Alex is one of my very favorite artists! Not only is she a “textile art jack-of-all-trades,” she’s also one heck of a beachcomber. Take a look at her newest stash! ~Amazing!

~~~

Originally posted on Under A Topaz Sky:

I’d heard about the beach at Seaham in County Durham being an amazing place for sea glass and after googling some pictures and drooling heavily, I persuaded the family to take a run up the A1 a few days ago, as it was half term, to make a visit.

There was a glass factory at Seaham from the middle of the 1800s to the early part of the twentieth century and with true Victorian disregard for the environment, at the end of the day, the glass waste was poured into the sea. The resulting glass, tumbled and frosted by the waves, comes up as little nuggets on the beach.

Seaham beach

I’m afraid I didn’t notice much of the actual beach or surroundings – as soon as we got there my head was down, searching, and marvelling over the way the shingle and sand is dotted with little globules of glass like bubbles, most…

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Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland | Tagged: , , , , | 23 Comments »

Beachy Keen Yarnbombers Strike Again!

Posted by Jody on May 29, 2013

I just had to share this amazing display of beach-themed creativity! Yarnbombers thrilled beachgoers last weekend by adorning the Saltburn Pier (UK) with 164 feet of very impressive yarn artistry. The whimsical display includes everything from mermaids to lighthouses and sun bathers to beach huts.

"This bank holiday weekend visitors to Saltburn Pier have been treated to another surprise display." (Gazette Live)

“This bank holiday weekend visitors to Saltburn Pier have been treated to another surprise display.”
(Text and photo: Gazette Live. Story by Marie Turbill. )

Here’s the link to the full Gazette Live story with a wonderful photo gallery and a video of the entire work of art: “Saltburn yarnbombers strike again as Pier is decorated for bank holiday weekend”

Be sure to look for the yellow submarine! ~Very cool!

The seaside piers around the coast of Britain stand as a powerful reminder of the achievements of Victorian engineers and entrepreneurs. There are currently less than 54 pleasure piers in existence around the UK coastline. Saltburn’s Victorian pier was the first iron pier to be built on the North East Coast, is the most northerly surviving British Pier and the only remaining pleasure pier on the North East coast. Built in an exposed position and facing due north into the cruel and unforgiving North Sea, the history of Saltburn Pier tells a tale of survival against the elements. The pier was commissioned by the Saltburn Pier Company in 1867, designed by Mr John Anderson and completed two years later, opening in May 1869.

Source: Saltburn by the Sea.com

Saltburn Pier – National Pier Society link: History of Saltburn Pier

I want to be a yarn bomber when I grow up! Can somebody teach me how to knit?

~~~

 

Posted in Amusement Piers, Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland, Beachy Keen Art | Tagged: , , , , , , | 8 Comments »

Have you heard the one about… Floating Gold?

Posted by Jody on February 4, 2013

Ambergris (photo by Peter Kaminski from Wikimedia Commons)

Ambergris (photo by Peter Kaminski from Wikimedia Commons)

We’ve made some wonderful acquaintances here at Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches. Recently, one of our favorite blogging friends, Wingclipped, at The Coastal Path shared a link with us that was quite intriguing! It seems that a Mr. Ken Wilman and his curious canine companion Madge were walking along a Lancashire beach in the North of England one day when they happened across a very smelly beach treasure on the sand. After a bit of google searching, Mr. Wilman discovered that their rock-like “floating gold” might be worth over $136,000 USD!

Wingclipped sent along this video link (which sadly refuses to be dis-embedded from the Sky News website, and therefore can not be directly posted here.  Go ahead and click the link below to see the video!).

http://news.sky.com/story/1045585/whale-vomit-worth-100000-found-on-dog-walk

FYI: What Ken and Madge actually found is a lump of ambergris. According to Merriam-Webster.com ambergris is “a waxy substance found floating in or on the shores of tropical waters, believed to originate in the intestines of the sperm whale, and used in perfumery as a fixative.”

Score one (a really big one) for beachcombers everywhere!

~ Sending along very special thanks to Wingclipped for sharing such a fun beachcombing story. You too can follow the family travels and antics of Wingclipped, his lovely wife, and their energetic twins as they explore the coast of Britain on foot at his blog The Coastal Path. His most recent entry is entitled “40d – Entering Dungeness” (Britain’s only desert and “Europe’s largest stretch of shingle landscape”). This week’s post comes complete with a heartwarming twist!

~~~

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland, Monday Miscellaneous, Whales and Dolphins | Tagged: , , , , , | 14 Comments »

 
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