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Archive for the ‘Monday Miscellaneous’ Category

New York City Beaches Make the Grade!

Posted by Jody on May 5, 2014

A while back, Greg and I visited New York City to attend a fabulous wedding at Terrace on the Park in Queens. Having decided to make a vacation out of the long trip from Albuquerque, we squeezed in some of the typical touristy stuff. You know, enjoying the hubbub in Times Square, strolling across the Brooklyn Bridge, taking a ride on the Staten Island Ferry, going to a ballgame. There is so much to do and see in New York City. The one thing we couldn’t miss, of course, was a trip to a Big Apple beach! The bride and groom highly recommended Rockaway Beach, the city’s only surfing beach, in the borough of Queens. So… we checked with our handy, reliable HopStop phone app, hopped on the bus, and set out to enjoy the day! And enjoy the day we did.

Rockaway Beach, Queens, New York City

Rockaway Beach, Queens, New York City

Rockaway Beach is a beautiful stretch of sand that was strewn with super sized Atlantic Surf Clam (Spisula solidissima) seashells the day of our visit. And I mean they were huge! NOAA‘s FishWatch site says that Atlantic Surf Clams are “the largest bivalves in the western North Atlantic.” They actually range all the way from Nova Scotia to South Carolina. These popular beach treasures can grow to over 7 inches across, making them the perfect soap dishes!

Seashell hunting was no challenge. The real challenge and fun of the day was the friendly beachcombing competition to find the most jumbo seashell specimen we could. It was a win-win day!

Rockaway Beach (Atlantic Surf Clam in the Foreground)

Rockaway Beach (Atlantic Surf Clam in the Foreground)

Running the length of the beach was  a well-kept boardwalk with maintained public restrooms. It’s easy to see by the early morning activity that Rockaway Beach is indeed one of New York City’s most popular beaches.  This favored municipal beach rated a “very good” in the 2011 biennial survey compiled by the advocacy group New Yorkers for Parks. Along with Rockaway Beach, Coney Island also rated “very good.” (In the survey, no beaches were rated “unsatisfactory,” as was the case for a couple of beaches in the previous two reporting surveys.) It’s always nice to bring home a good report card!

Rockaway Beach Boardwalk (Pre-Superstorm Sandy)

Rockaway Beach Boardwalk (Pre-Superstorm Sandy)

As you can imagine, in October of 2012, Superstorm Sandy caused great damage to New York City’s coastal areas, boardwalks, and beaches. Happily, progress is being made in the restoration of Rockaway Beach. In an April 2014 update, The New York City Department of Parks & Recreation announced:

“After Hurricane Sandy, more than $140 million was invested to repair and restore Rockaway Beach. As part of this work, intact sections of boardwalk were repaired, damaged beach buildings were renovated with new boardwalk islands constructed around them, public restrooms and lifeguard stations were installed to replace destroyed facilities, and interim shoreline protection and anti-erosion measures were created. Thanks to this work, more than 3 million people visited Rockaway Beach throughout the 2013 beach season.”

 ♪ ♫ “Start spreading the news…” ♪ ♫ New York City’s beaches are Grade A!

~~~

 Do you have a favorite New York City beach?  We’d love to hear about it!

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Posted in Atlantic Coast Beaches, Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Monday Miscellaneous, Seashells | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

A Seashell in My Pocket

Posted by Jody on March 10, 2014

Jody:

Pocket Seashells

Pocket Seashells

Happy Monday! I just found some of these little beauties on Maggie’s site and thought it was a great time to share these pocket-sized stress-busting beach treasures once again.

Originally posted on Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches:

We’re always looking for ways to use our special beachcombing finds. Here is just one more idea for putting those beach treasures to good use ~ everyday!

You may have heard of worry stones (or pocket stones) – those little, highly polished pieces of gemstone with a slight indention for your thumb.  I’ve often seen them for sale near the cash registers of gift shops and kitschy boutiques. They can be kind of pricey.

Rumored to have originated in Ancient Greece, when held between the thumb and forefinger, worry stones are supposed to relieve stress and reduce worries. Light enough to keep in your pocket, you can readily fidget with one in stressful or nerve-racking situations.

There is another version of the pocket stone that doesn’t have the smooth indentation for the thumb.  They are called  reflection stones and are used as a reminder to stay calm, balanced, grateful, etc. …

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Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Monday Miscellaneous, Seashells | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Explore These Amazing Beaches

Posted by Jody on October 28, 2013

Today’s Featured Guest Writer is Andrea.

Explore These Amazing Beaches

 Ayia Napa, Cyprus (Photo by Paul167 /Wikimedia)

Ayia Napa, Cyprus (Photo by Paul167 /Wikimedia)

Ayia Napa, Cyprus

This resort city on Cyprus’ shore has a unique vibe to it, which has earned its reputation as the perfect place to have parties that start in the afternoon and last all night long, everyday thanks to this Mediterranean island’s warm climate. Ayia Napa is home to the largest water park in Europe: Water World.

The medieval monasteries on the coastline overlooking the blue waters of the Mediterranean are open for visitors every day, making Ayia Napa’s beach an interactive and family-friendly destination. Organized cruises take tourists to sea, where they can dive the blue waters of the Mediterranean and explore the colorful marine life.

Negril, Jamaica (Photo by Alphakaya/Wikimedia)

Negril, Jamaica (Photo by Alphakaya/Wikimedia)

Negril Beach, Jamaica

Have you ever wondered what the perfect sunset looks like? Then you should come to Negril Beach on the Caribbean island of Jamaica and see for yourself. The sunset at Negril Beach is considered one of the loveliest on the planet and attracts numerous honeymooners and couples on the Jamaican beach of Negril.

Seven Mile Beach is the largest beach in Negril and, just as its name implies, is a seven miles stretch of sand.

Poipu Beach Park, Kauai, Hawaii (Photo by  Polihale/Wikipedia)

Poipu Beach Park, Kauai, Hawaii (Photo by Polihale/Wikipedia)

Poipu Beach, Kauai, Hawaii

A small corner of paradise on the island of Kauai in Hawaii, the golden sand beaches enclosed by tall palm trees await tourists on the sunbathed Poipu Beach with numerous attractions. The secluded beaches and romantic promenades make Poipu Beach one of the premier honeymoon destinations in the Hawaiian Islands.

The island of Kauai offers numerous outdoor activities, from water sports to mountaineering. Tourists can try mountain biking or hiking up the neighboring mountains. Water sports enthusiasts can kayak, surf, scuba dive, or fish.

Adventure Bay Beach, Tasmania

If you are in search for a less crowded beach, then the Tasmanian shores are the answer. Adventure Beach is one of those places in the world that have not yet been invaded by large resorts and luxurious hotels, where life still unwinds at a slow pace. The long sandy beach is the perfect place to sunbathe, swim in warm and friendly waters, and relax in a hammock under the palm trees. The neighboring mountains are just waiting to be explored by nature lovers. Many nearby hotels are eco-friendly.

 Punta Cana, Dominican Republic (Photo by  Inmouchar/Wikimedia)

Punta Cana, Dominican Republic (Photo by Inmouchar/Wikimedia)

Punta Cana Beach, Dominican Republic

Caribbean postcards usually have one thing in common: Punta Cana Beach. It is the ultimate picture-perfect retreat, with crystal-clear waters and coconut trees swaying in the wind, all in the vicinity of a rich tropical forest. Located on the eastern coast of the Dominican Republic, Punta Cana means “Point of the White Cane Palms” and was named after the cane palms which grow in the area. Here, 40 kilometers of beaches overlook both the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. Punta Cana Beach is home to numerous all-inclusive resorts.

Opening up to the Caribbean Sea, Playa Blanca is the most popular resort on Punta Cana Beach. Playa Blanca means “white beach” and owes its name to its white sands.

About the Author: Andrea is a Blogger and Write from UK. She loves to write articles on various categories like Finance, Technology, Travel and Health. As of now she is doing a research work on ukba.

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Posted in Featured Guest Writer, Monday Miscellaneous, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , , , | 4 Comments »

The Spice of Life

Posted by Jody on September 16, 2013

Texas Gulf Coast Seashells

Texas Gulf Coast Seashells

Variety is the spice of life!

~~~

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Gulf of Mexico Beaches, Monday Miscellaneous, Sand and Shoreline, Today's Special | Tagged: , , , , | 11 Comments »

52c – Brighton Part IV

Posted by Jody on June 17, 2013

Jody:

This is one of our favorite beach blogs: The Coastal Path ~ One family’s walk around the coast of Britain. This week the family is touring the Brighton Pier and Brighton’s fabulous shingle beach (a beach which is formed of pebbles). By the way, don’t even think about collecting those beach pebbles! Brighton’s Seafront Officer once told me: We do not allow stone collections from the beach unfortunately. This is because we need to maintain the level of shingle on the beach to assist with coastal defence, so for this reason it is not permitted.

 ~ Oh well, there are plenty of other beaches to comb!

~~~

You can read our family’s very own Brighton Beach memoir here: Brighton ~ A Top 10 British Memory.

~~~

Originally posted on The Coastal Path:

We left the Brighton Wheel and headed off up the pier for the rides.  Brighton Pier started off life as the Palace Pier, built in 1823 to service passenger ships arriving from Dieppe.  Over the years it grew and grew into the attraction it is today.  I was quite astonished to find that over its long history it has not once been destroyed by fire, flood, or fractious young fellows with far-fetched foibles (ie kids with matches).  Compared to many of its brethren, Brighton Pier has fared well over the years.

Brighton Pier

As we walked up there were good views back to the east.

View Back East from Brighton PierWhat we were really looking for, however, were the rides.  My wife and aunt decided they were far too mature for such juvenile delights and left the kids and I to our childishness.  It was quite fun, really…

Wild River with insert…although some of us got a little wet…

Wild RiverThe…

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Posted in Amusement Piers, Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland, Monday Miscellaneous, Sand and Shoreline | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

SHORE THINGS: BEACHCOMBING ON A PRISTINE ABACO BEACH

Posted by Jody on June 17, 2013

Jody:

What a wonderful way to start the week! Let’s grab our sunhats and go…

Originally posted on ROLLING HARBOUR ABACO:

Shore Things 16

SHORE THINGS: BEACHCOMBING ON A PRISTINE ABACO BEACH

The Abaco bay known as Rolling Harbour is a 3/4 mile curve of white sand beach, protected by an off-shore reef. The beach is pristine. Or it would be but for two factors. One is the seaweed that arrives when the wind is from the east – natural and biodegradable detritus. It provides food and camouflage for many species of shorebird – plover and sandpipers of all varieties from large to least. The second – far less easily dealt with – is the inevitable plastic junk washed up on every tide. This has to be collected up and ‘binned’, a never-ending cycle of plastic trash disposal. Except for the ATLAS V SPACE-ROCKET FAIRING found on the beach, that came from the Mars ‘Curiosity’ launch. Sandy's Mystery Object

We kept is as a… curiosity, until it was eventually removed by the men in black…

Shore Things 14I’d intended…

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Posted in Atlantic Coast Beaches, Beach and Coastal Wildlife, Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Monday Miscellaneous, Sand and Shoreline, Seashells | Tagged: , , , | 2 Comments »

An Early Morning Walk

Posted by Jody on June 10, 2013

An Early Morning Walk

An Early Morning Walk

Take my hand.
We will walk.
We will only walk.
We will enjoy our walk
without thinking of arriving anywhere.
Walk peacefully.
Walk happily.

~ Thich Nhat Hanh, Walking Meditation

~~~

Posted in Gulf of Mexico Beaches, Monday Miscellaneous, Today's Special | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

Santa Cruz-a-palooza (Part 4: The Surfers)

Posted by Jody on June 3, 2013

Surf’s Up!  ~Early May in Santa Cruz on California’s Central Coast~

On our last day in Santa Cruz, Greg and I were thrilled to catch the surfers off of Cowell Beach. The water near the Santa Cruz Surfing Museum was teeming with wet-suited folks just waiting for the perfect wave. As we stood at the railing happily watching the action, I noticed more surfers quickly running toward the picturesque cliffs to enter the water. Not knowing if this was their usual routine, I wondered whether this was an especially good morning for surfing in Santa Cruz. You can see in the photo collage that we caught sight of one of the younger surfers jumping into the ocean from the unstable cliff edge. Most of the surfers just scrambled down the precarious bluff to the water’s edge to (safely?) enter the surf.

Wouldn’t the Beach Boys be proud?  ♬Catch a wave and you’re sitting on top of the world!♫

Surfing history in Santa Cruz, California:

“History records that surfboard riding first began in the Hawaiian Islands hundreds of years ago. It took until the late 1800′s and early 1900′s before it was introduced to the U.S. Mainland, mostly along the southern coast of California. Surfing became known in the Santa Cruz area when a few young men from the beaches of southern California migrated to the San Francisco Bay Area to seek jobs or to attend college. They already knew how to surf and brought their boards with them. Soon they discovered the beaches of Monterey Bay and the outstanding surf breaking across the outer reefs and sandbars at Cowell’s Beach.”

Source: Hal Goody, History of the Santa Cruz Surfing Club,  Santa Cruz Public Libraries

Additional links:

Surfing Santa Cruz

Riders of the Sea Spray

Santa Cruz Surfing Museum

Friction in Santa Cruz waters: Paddle boarders, surfers battle

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Posted in Monday Miscellaneous, Northern California Beaches, Surfing Beach | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Simple Seaside Safety Suggestions for Spot

Posted by Jody on April 29, 2013

Quintana Beach County Park

Quintana Beach County Park

My family and I recently enjoyed another lovely day trip to Quintana Beach County Park, one of our absolute favorite Texas coastal recreation areas. This 51-acre natural beachfront playground  is the ultimate dog-friendly family choice in the Lone Star State. Located in Freeport, Texas, on the Gulf of Mexico, it’s a wonderfully scenic and a relatively quick (1 ½ hour) drive south of Houston. Quintana Beach County Park is a much more laid back alternative to the city and beaches of Galveston, which have all of the hustle and bustle you would expect from a typical seaside tourist mecca.

Quintana Beach County Park on the Upper Gulf Coast of Texas

Quintana Beach County Park on the Upper Gulf Coast of Texas

You can feel free to bring Spot along for your day at the beach. At Quintana Beach County Park our tail-wagging companions are welcome.

“Pet Safety on the Beach” as posted at Quintana Beach County Park:

  • If the sand is too hot for your bare feet, it’s too hot for your dog’s paws.
  • Keep fresh water available for your dog, drinking salt water will make him sick.
  • Use pet-friendly sunscreen on short hair, ears and nose.
  • Provide shade for your dog to rest.

~All very good safety tips~ Please remember that pets need to be restrained (at this beach) at all times and, of course, picking up after Spot is a must!

Quintana Beach County Park, Texas

Quintana Beach County Park, Texas

A while back we published a post on the many reasons to visit this lovely beach park: Quintana Beach County Park on the Texas Gulf Coast – So Many Reasons to Visit. The list includes camp sites (tents, RVs, and vacation cabins), picnic tables, modern restrooms and showers, kayaking, surfing, beachcombing, fishing… and the list goes on.  Being dog-friendly simply adds one more great reason for families to plan the perfect fun-filled trip to Quintana Beach County Park!

Do you have a favorite dog-friendly beach? Please share it with us. We’d love to know!

Here are a few more helpful links:

Quintana Beach County Park

Cesar’s Tips for Your Dog’s Day at the Beach

Doggie Heaven! Muir Beach, California

Have a great day at the beach!

~~~

Posted in Beach Safety Tips, Gulf of Mexico Beaches, Monday Miscellaneous | Tagged: , , , , , | 6 Comments »

Weekly Photo Challenge: Up

Posted by Jody on April 22, 2013

Looking up at the tallest lighthouse on the Oregon coast:

Yaqina Head Light, Newport, Oregon

Yaquina Head Lighthouse, Newport, Oregon

Gazing up 92 feet:

Yaquina Head Lighthouse

Yaquina Head Lighthouse, Newport, Oregon

Peering up inside the Yaquina Head Lighthouse tower – 114 stairs to the watch room:

Inside Yaquina Head Light

Inside Yaquina Head Lighthouse Tower


When the lighthouse was constructed in 1872, the children of lighthouse keepers and lighthouse visitors were not permitted to climb the 114 stairs in the tower to the watch room because the US Lighthouse Service feared they would trip and fall on the steep stairs or squeeze between the posts of the handrails. The Yaquina Head Lighthouse retains its historic stairs and handrails and thus the safety of children climbing the stairs is still a concern. Today, children must be at least 42 inches tall to climb the stairs of the tower. Additionally, adults must accompany and assist children ascending the lighthouse tower.

Source: Bureau of Land Management

I will vouch for that justifiable feeling of fear on the part of the US Lighthouse Service! On our last visit to this splendid lighthouse and the surrounding Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area, our 5 year old grandson was “tall enough” to climb the 114 stairs to the top of the tower. I confess to being the big sissy of the group. The little guy waited patiently with my understanding hubby and quizzical son-in-law as I whizzed by them to climb to the top and back by myself. My very prudent and proper “respect” for heights seems to quickly blossom into a full blown scardey-cattedness when I’m with little ones (I know I’m not alone in this*)!

Come on up!

Glancing up at the first order Fresnel lens, manufactured in Paris in 1868 by Barbier & Fenestres:

Yaquina Head Light

Yaquina Head Lighthouse Lens

About the light:

The light has been active since Head Keeper Fayette Crosby walked up the 114 steps, to light the wicks on the evening of August 20, 1873. At that time the oil burning fixed white light was displayed from sunset to sunrise. Today, the fully automated first order Fresnel lens runs on commercial power and flashes its unique pattern of 2 seconds on, 2 seconds off, 2 seconds on, 14 seconds off, 24 hours a day. The oil burning wicks have been replaced with a 1000 watt globe.

Source: Friends of Yaquina Lighthouses

A view from the top of Yaquina Head Lighthouse toward the beaches of the Oregon Coast

Looking north from the top of Yaquina Head Lighthouse toward the beautiful beaches of the Oregon Coast

It was a “Great Day for UP!”

*My case in point: The Coastal Path, 36c – Kingsdown to St Margarets at Cliffe

~~~

WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Up

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Posted in Lighthouses, Monday Miscellaneous, Pacific Coast Beaches | Tagged: , , , , , , | 20 Comments »

 
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