Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches

One Shell of a Find!

  • Like us on Facebook!

  • Come Join Us! Treasure Hunters

  • Copyright Notice

    The contents of this site are copyright Beach Treasures And Treasure Beaches.com and may not be copied or used without written permission from the Beach Treasures And Treasure Beaches staff. The posts may be quoted in part, so long as credit is given where it is due and so long as you link the quote back to this page. Thank you kindly for your cooperation and for your interest in our passion for beaches.
    ©2011-2017 Beach Treasures And Treasure Beaches.com.
    All Rights Reserved.

  • Disclaimer

    Links to third-party websites are provided as a convenience to users; Beach Treasures And Treasure Beaches.com does not control or endorse their content.

Summer Stingray Safety

Posted by E.G.D. on August 3, 2011

Hi, again, and welcome to Wednesday Wildlife!  Jody found some interesting stingray safety info in The Sanibel Shell Guide (which she reviewed, earlier), and this led her to prompt me to look up some more modern ray safety advice.  The results are as follows:

The Gasparilla Gazette has an excellent page that uses the exact same words as The Sanibel Shell Guide: “the sting ray shuffle.”  Pretty much every beach where rays hang out in the shallows, it is important to shuffle your feet in the sand so that you don’t step on the poor things and scare them into causing you grievous bodily harm (which is almost invariably extremely painful but extremely temporary).  This particular article also has some very sound advice about what to do if you are stung by a ray, and what symptoms a stung person should expect.

Stingray photo by Adamantiaf from Wikimedia Commons

If you are planning to head to Malaysia for a fun-filled beach vacation, I very highly recommend that you check out this site.   It details safety protocol for dealing with a remarkably wide range of creatures on which you never, ever want to step.  The info for stingrays is about halfway down the page.  They not only recommend that you not step on rays, but that you not swim too close or directly above them (apparently swimming above them makes them think of you as more of a threat).

Ehow.com has a very good article with a couple other safety pointers for avoiding stingray injuries, including a recommendation that you not swim too close to the ocean floor (this is particularly geared toward divers) and a recommendation that you not swim near jetties or piers where rays are known to gather.

Finally, itsnature.org has a great and detailed page that lists stingray attributes as well as stingray safety procedures.  From this, I learned that a stingray’s sting can be poisonous even after the stingray has died.  Yipes!  That’s one more reason to pay attention to where you step on a beach where stingrays live.

There you have it!  Play it safe this summer and remember to shuffle- E.G.D.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: