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Author Archive

S.H.A.R.K. in the Sky!

Posted by E.G.D. on September 23, 2016

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Photograph © Jody Diehl

It isn’t really noticeable here in the Houston area yet, but it is officially autumn!  Can you believe it?  Summer just flew by.  One way or another, we’re past peak beach season, which never really made much sense to me.  In the autumn and winter months, I’m as likely to go to the beach as spring and summer.  Granted, the sorts of things I do on the beaches change with the seasons.  In the colder months, most of us are pretty unlikely to go wading and swimming, but shelling is often best in the dead of winter, and if you ask me, there’s no better time for beach kite flying than autumn!  Here in La Porte, TX, we are truly fortunate to have a spectacular organization that sends sea creatures into the sky on a pretty regular basis right at our very own Sylvan Beach: The South Houston Area Recreational Kiters, or S.H.A.R.K. for short.

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Photograph © Jody Diehl

At the tail end of last autumn, Jody (my mom) captured some great photographs of some S.H.A.R.K. kites, and while we were there, the kiters kindly arranged it so that we could pet the dolphin kite (and while doing so, we got a chance to show everyone how big these kites really are!).  The only photo in this lineup that does not belong to Jody is the one of crab ground-kites, which were at Sylvan Beach on a different day and were photographed by F. Travis Riley.  I hope you enjoy the slideshow:

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If you like what you see, S.H.A.R.K. meets to fly beachy kites at beaches all over the Port of Houston/Galveston Bay area.  They have a great calendar of events that lets you know where they’ll be and when.

Have a great start to your autumn, everyone!  I hope you don’t miss a chance to see high-flying sea creatures at a beach sometime soon- E.G.D.

Posted in Friday Finds, Gulf of Mexico Beaches | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Best Little Beach Towns On The Pacific Coast

Posted by E.G.D. on July 16, 2016

Today’s Featured Guest Writer is Claire Lovesti.

The west coast may be best known for San Fran and LA, but these beachy babies are sure to make any vacation worthwhile.

The big stars of California (L.A., Long Beach, Napa Valley) and bustling cities of Washington (Space needle anyone?) get all the good reviews on TripAdvisor, but when it comes to getting the small town experience to a t, it’s more about the west coast towns that are a little off the radar.

From beautiful northern islands all the way down to Laguna, here are five beaches that are bound to make you lust after a trip out west.

  1. San Juan Islands, Washington
View_of_Roche_Harbor_at_Sunset_from_the_McMillan_Suites

View of Roche Harbor from the McMillan Suites by Bhsantos

This archipelago in Washington with a penchant for northwestern landscape and wildlife are literally a sight to behold. From the horseshoe shaped Orca Island to the bustling Roche Harbor on San Juan, there’s plenty to do and see here to make any beach vacation a gorgeous one. For orca whale sightings, head for the national park on Orca Island. For great hiking and kayaking, head for Moran State Park. With accessibility between these islands limited almost exclusively to boats (Anacorte is the only town you can connect to the mainland by bridge), it’s a dream situation where you’re literally cut off from the rest of the world by, at the very least, a charming ferry ride. Stay at the Roche Harbor Resort in your very own town house and grab a bite at Lime Kiln Cafe—it’s a mix of great views and a great breakfast!

  1. Cannon Beach, Oregon
©Jody Diehl

Haystack Rock, Cannon Beach, Oregon

Cannon Beach may be Oregan’s less famous beach town, but it gets you out of the way of all of the tourist traffic of Seaside and offers the same excellent beach feel. Haystack Rock is known for it’s killer landscape and beautiful beach atmosphere (also well known for being featured in The Goonies and Point Break) and is a must-see stop on your itinerary, as is Hug Point State Recreation Park with it’s waterfall and excellent hiking opportunities. Arch Cape Inn & Retreat will provide European style architecture (and eco-friendly outdoor excursions) while Cannon Beach Hotel offers the classic New England style B&B with excellent beach views. With a healthy restaurateur selection, I suggest making plans at The Irish Table (worth the wait in line) and Tom’s Fish and Chips for a local, quick bite.

  1. Monterey, California
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Cannery Row’s Beach in Monterey, CA

Monterey’s claim to fame may have been all the sardine canneries along the coast, but good news for the tourists (and for the smell) Cannery Row is now a waterfront delight that looks like the “Good Ole Days” but is bustling with excellent, modern attractions. Boasting an excellent seaside aquarium, a stellar brewing company (an original Cannery Row beer milkshake anyone?), and a beautiful inn or two, Monterey is the place to go for local culture, flavor, and an authentic West Coast beach vibe that has nothing to do with surfing or getting the perfect beach tan. American classic novelist John Steinbeck wrote of the Canneries in his novel, Cannery Row, and while Steinbeck’s character enjoyed his beer milkshake, I bet any traveller is going to enjoy it more since it’s gotten an upgrade since it’s literary mention in 1945.

  1. Santa Barbara, California
Aerial-SantaBarbaraCA10-28-08

By John Wiley User:Jw4nvc – Santa Santa Barbara, California

 

While Santa Barbara might not be anyone’s idea of a small beach town, it’s undeniable that this charming city by the sea is definitely underrated. From the picturesque boardwalk to the extensive botanical gardens, there’s so much more to do than just enjoy the beach life (and that’s perfectly great for me). This beach town is perfect for travelers who like to get in plenty of cultural stops as well as sun rays, so make sure to stop at Lotusland for an exotic botanical experience, the Chumash Painted Cave State Historic Park including Native American stone paintings, and Arlington Theatre for a cool, old-fashioned movie theatre vibe.

For fans of a packed itinerary, download the Best of Santa Barbara app from the iTunes store for free and enjoy the limitless options that the city has to offer. Heading to the West Coast from out of town? All non-US travelers can grab a local SIM card for their unlocked iPhone and save on international plans while keeping the same service!

  1. Laguna Beach, California
Laguna Beach Califonria by D Ramey Logan

Laguna Beach, CA by D Ramey Logan

 

While the innuendo of a Lauren Conrad or Kristin Cavallari apocalypse comes along with any mention of Laguna, it’s still the most picturesque little beach town on the California coast. Full of art galleries, fantastic restaurants, and that full-on beach town vibe, this nook previously visited by artists and writers is now a great place for families, couples, and friends to go on vacation. If you’ve got the vacation budget, I suggest a stay at the The Inn At Laguna Beach—crystal beach water views, excellent food and coffee, and just steps away from the main town center of Laguna.

If you’re aiming for a relaxed, off the beaten path vibe, these five choices are sure to give you that beach tan and hang ten vibe—just a word of warning, you may never want to leave!

About the author:
I’m Claire – a self-confessed travel nut. I’ve been traveling around the world since my mum farewelled me in a teary goodbye and I haven’t looked back since. You can read all about my adventures through 48 cities in 26 countries on 4 continents on my blog Traveltio.com.

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A note from our Treasure Hunters:

We simply love to share when it comes to beaches, treasure hunting, beachcombing crafts, and beachy tips. How about you? Do you have a favorite beach you’d like to share with us? Maybe you have some great tips for beach picnics, seaside safety, or seashore activities. Please check out our Submission Guidelines for info on jumping into the fun at Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches.  You could be our next Featured Guest Writer!

Posted in A Treasure of a Beach (Best Beaches), Beaches of North America, Featured Guest Writer, Northern California Beaches, Pacific Coast Beaches, Southern California Beaches | Tagged: , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Jake and Carla’s Texas Treasure Trove

Posted by E.G.D. on July 8, 2016

Today’s guest post, including the beautiful beach treasure photographs, is courtesy of Jake and Carla W.

Hi. I’m Jake and my treasure hunting partner is my wife Carla. This is my first post. The first pics are from 7/5/16, and the rest are from the last 2 to 3 months. We live south of Houston in Brazoria county. We treasure hunt in 3 Texas counties: Galveston, Brazoria, and Matagorda.

The last pics we think might be a partial megalodon tooth! I’ve emailed pics to a professor, but we haven’t heard back. Any input on that from the readers of Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches would be appreciated.

As you can see we like to go to the beach. Carla says its the only place we get along (LOL!). Anyway, enjoy the photos and happy hunting.  -Jake and Carla.

About the Authors: “Jake and I are both in our 40’s and have been together for a little over three years. We love camping, fishing and shell seeking. We seem to have created an unspoken deal where he teaches me how to catch really big fish and I try to teach him the patience and tenacity needed to find shark teeth. I’m more into shells and driftwood, he’s searching for antique bottles and the occasional pirate treasure chest. To an outsider, we must seem odd, as we can go for hours with very little conversation and be content being with one another and our passions. But it works for us.” ~Carla

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Texas Gulf Coast beaches: A Sea Glass Treasure Trove – Surfside Beach

Elusive Bryan Beach

Galveston Island: A Texas Oasis

Quintana Beach County Park on the Texas Gulf Coast

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A note from our Treasure Hunters:

We simply love to share when it comes to beaches, treasure hunting, beachcombing crafts, and beachy tips. How about you? Do you have a favorite beach you’d like to share with us? Maybe you have some great tips for beach picnics, seaside safety, or seashore activities. Please check out our Submission Guidelines for info on jumping into the fun at Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches.  You could be our next Featured Guest Writer!

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Beaches of North America, Featured Guest Writer, Friday Finds, Gulf of Mexico Beaches, Seashells | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments »

Hit Popular Lakes this Summer with a Metal Detector

Posted by E.G.D. on September 3, 2015

While we are only about halfway through the summer, many people consider the summer over after Labor Day.  Either way, time is of the essence!  Go find yourself a beach while the weather is balmy, ladies and gentlemen, and while you’re in the planning phase, you can read this guest article by Daniel Bernzweig!  Happy last-holiday-weekend-of-summer, everyone- E.G.D.

Photo from Photopin

Walkway Lake Michigan by Daniel Marchese from Photopin

Hit Popular Lakes this Summer with a Metal Detector by guest blogger Daniel Bernzweig

Summertime is the perfect time for treasure hunting in the water. Shallow water hunting with a metal detector is a hobby anyone can enjoy—especially the outdoorsy types. For people who are not snorkelers or divers, shallow water treasure hunting is the perfect option. And while many states are landlocked, every state but Maryland has natural freshwater lakes. The folks in Maryland are lucky enough to be ocean side, so they can detect along busy beaches and the Atlantic shoreline. For hobbyists near the lake, popular boating & swimming areas are the places to hunt with an underwater metal detector.

Inland Islands and Sandbars are ‘Treasure Zones’

One tip water detectorists offer is to search the sandbars of popular lakes. This is where boats drop anchor so people can swim in warmer, more shallow water. Sandbars are also hotspots for boaters to tie lines together and anchor for social gatherings. Muscamoot Bay in Lake St. Clair, Michigan is one such area where boaters try to set records every year with a “Raft Off.” Small islands are also known for their social festivities. Put In Bay, Ohio is known as one of “America’s 10 Best Party Islands,” as well as a top freshwater island vacation spot. Holiday weekends and warmer weather can bring thousands of partying boaters to these destinations. The boaters are slicked up with suntan lotion, jumping into the water and engaging in festivities, games and activities. This inevitably leads to coins and jewelry falling off and getting lost in the water. A prime opportunity for water treasure hunters!

Underwater Pinpointing and Treasure Recovery

Before you dip your machine into water, be sure to check that it is a waterproof  model. Some models, like the Garrett Ace 250, are only waterproof up to the control box. Its fine to get the coil and stem wet, but submerging the control box would be bad news.

Locating and retrieving targets in the water can be a challenge until you get some good practice in. A good technique is to use the pinpoint mode on your detector. Hold the button and find the strongest signal, then slowly pull the coil  towards you until the signal drops off. That will tell you the target is just off  the front edge of your search coil. Once you have pinpointing your target, you’ll need your sand scoop. Slowly push down on the scoop handle so it is prying the sand up. Make sure the scoop’s contents don’t come coming flyinur foot to support the scoop until you get it out of the water. Scan the hole; if the object is still in the holg out of the scoop. For deeper water, you can use yoe, dump the scoop underwater and get another scoop full. Rescan the area once you have located a target. Coin spills are very common in the water, so other coins may come right up with your next scoops of sand.

Required Equipment: Waterproof VLF metal detector. Short or long-handled scoop.

Very Low Frequency (VLF) Metal Detectors are the preferred models for freshwater hunting. They typically operate in the 3 to 30 kHz frequency range and they are motion detectors. They are highly capable of locating coins, relics, and jewelry. Waterproof VLF detectors can be used in fresh or salt water when beach metal detecting. However, they are known to react to salt and can become erratic around wet ocean sand.

Which Metal Detectors are Best for Freshwater Hunting?

Beach and underwater treasure hunters have strong preferences for specific underwater metal detectors. Experienced treasure hunters like the Garrett AT Pro model. This unit is often praised for its superb discrimination in fresh and salt water. Tesoro also gets high marks for the Tiger Shark. Hobbyists who are hooked on Fisher detectors tout the Fisher CZ-21 for use at both salt and freshwater beaches.

Biography

About the author: Daniel Bernzweig manages MetalDetector.com in Southborough, MA. He has written on the subject of treasure hunting and metal detecting since the mid 1980’s. He enjoys traveling with his metal detector and helping to educate others in the correct use of metal detectors in their explorations.

Posted in beach metal detecting | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

Toes in the Sand and Lights on the Water: Sylvan Beach Fireworks

Posted by E.G.D. on July 6, 2015

Some of you regular readers out there are probably a little Sylvan Beach-ed out by now, but I just keep having more to say about it!  For one, I’m there every chance I get, and for another, many of La Porte’s awesome community events take place there.  The one I’m featuring in this article is the yearly 4th of July fireworks at the beach, which are truly spectacular because they’re fired from the end of the fishing pier and the lights shine twice: once in the sky, once on the water.  Even better, for about half an hour before our fireworks started, I could see the Baytown and Seabrook community fireworks displays, which also shone on the water, though a little farther away to the north and south respectively.

Now, once upon a time I could see fireworks displays over the Pacific Ocean any weekend I felt like walking or catching a bus to Waikiki, so you’d think I might lose my fascination for this sort of thing, but that most certainly isn’t the case.  There really is nothing more enchanting than seeing fireworks over the water with my toes in the soft sand and the waves lapping at my ankles, and the charm increases exponentially with the brevity of the walk it takes to get me there (in this case, it’s 7 minutes, so I am still exuding glee 24 hours later).  I got a couple decent little videos with my cell, and I thought it would be fun to share them with the wonderful Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches crowd.  Here’s the clip with the finale:

Even in low-resolution, it’s pretty spiffy, and it’s amazing the video turned out so well, considering I paid absolutely no attention to the camera while I was watching that.  I’m already looking forward to next year’s event!  I quite literally extended invitations to the event to  my family already, even though none of them know where they’re going to be next July.  In any case, the event is worth sharing, so I hope they can all make it.

I hope you all had a great Independence Day, and hey, it’s summer!  If you’re in the Northern Hemisphere, go find yourself a beach- E.G.D.

Posted in A Treasure of a Beach (Best Beaches), Gulf of Mexico Beaches | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Sylvan Beach Festival 2015

Posted by E.G.D. on May 6, 2015

Brown Water and Crashing Waves: Day After a Storm (photo by E.G.D.)

Brown Water and Crashing Waves: After a Storm (photo by E.G.D.)

I’ve been hearing stories about Sylvan Beach Festival since I started working in Pasadena in January 2014, and when the banners went up around La Porte in the early spring, I was pretty excited!  The town sent out pamphlets with information about who would be performing on the stage, the town’s tiny monthly newspaper rejoiced, and I made plans to go on Saturday 4/25.

I was therefore, not unnaturally annoyed when I woke up to a violent lightning storm that lasted straight through the scheduled time for the parade.  As you can tell from the photo above, though, by 1:00 in the afternoon the weather had changed its mind, and there was barely a cloud in the sky!  Granted, the water was more brown than I have ever seen it, and the waves were actually crashing!  Seriously.  Crashing!  In the bay!  I have never seen the like at Sylvan Beach, and let me tell you, the 40-or-so kids who were playing in the swells were having the time of their lives.

A few feet away from the beach, the festival was in full swing by the time I arrived, with stalls selling pretty much everything, midway rides, cooking competitions, live country music, and a cook-off.

Stalls on the water (photo by E.G.D.)

Stalls on the water (photo by E.G.D.)

The music was pretty good, though I’ll admit I’m not a big fan of country.  The stage was right on the water, so even with the amps booming, everyone in the audience could hear the crashing waves mixed in with the instrumentals ^_^.

Stage (photo by E.G.D.)

Stage (photo by E.G.D.)

I didn’t actually do anything at the midway, but I did take a picture:

DSCN0436It reminded me a lot of state and county fairs I’ve been to.  It was fun, and it was worth the $5 admission fee.  Normally, the beach is free, but normally the beach doesn’t have live music and a midway. I’m definitely going to the festival again next year, and maybe next year I’ll get to see the parade ^_^. -E.G.D.

Posted in Gulf of Mexico Beaches | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

Aloha from Hilo

Posted by E.G.D. on April 2, 2015

Black sand and kayaks (photo © Jody Diehl)

Black sand and kayaks (photo © Jody Diehl)

We started the day on the Big Island of Hawaii with a kayak tour of Hilo Bay, crossing the bay and riding the swells. We ended the crossing going up river to a secluded cove with banyan trees and multiple waterfalls that used to serve as power to sugar mills. We returned to the black sand beach along Hilo Bay Beachfront Park before lunch and went back to change and eat on the ship.

Having been to the Big Island before, we decided to simply tour on foot  the rest of the day. The Hilo Port/Bay area is dotted with numerous beach parks and small secluded coves for swimming, paddle boarding, picnicking, fishing, and boating.

We finished our day with swimming at Reeds Bay Beach Park, where families were settled in for a day of fun in the sun. There were picnickers, paddle boarders, swimmers, and canoeists all enjoying the clean little coral strewn shoreline. A local told us about the Wailoa River that meets the sea here and produces the cold water pooling in the “Ice Pond.’ The cold water combines with very warm water produced by the underwater lava vents. You swim from cold to warm and back to cold with each stroke. Pretty neat!

Have a wonderful day! – Jody & Greg

Posted in Beaches of The Hawaiian Islands, Sand and Shoreline | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

Tiny May be the Next Big Thing: Sylvan Beach, La Porte… Again!

Posted by E.G.D. on March 29, 2015

Jumping for Joy on Sylvan Beach (Photo © E.G.D.)

Jumping for Joy on Sylvan Beach (Photo © E.G.D.)

The weather here on the Texas gulf coast has been absolutely stellar lately, and I am pleased as punch to have a beach easy walking distance from my home.  Not unnaturally, one of the best parts about having a beach right next door is sharing that beach with my friends and family.  Now, I realize that I have posted about Sylvan Beach before, but yesterday’s Sylvan Beach experience is worthy of note because my sister (and noted doctor of geo sciences), Kristie, decided to start a tiny rock collection, and of course the kids, my friend Travis (of guest posting fame) and I joined in with gusto!

Collecting (Photo © E.G.D.)

Collecting (Photo © E.G.D.)

Now, between the five of us, we had a really substantial collection going… but because we were collecting tiny, tiny treasures, the pile was small enough to easily fit into the palm of, say, Oona’s kindergardener-sized hand.  Kristie thought that a collection of tiny rocks would be much easier on the movers when next she moves than, say, the truly substantially-sized rock collections she and her fellow geologist husband have accumulated over the years (“What’s in these boxes, anyway, rocks?!??” … “Um… actually…”), and I must agree, though I don’t think she and Ryan have any intention of ditching the larger rocks along the way.  Anyhow, fun, right?  We found some really good treasures.  Behold!

Tiny Treasures (Photo © E.G.D.)

Tiny Treasures (Photo © E.G.D.)

A budding collection (Photo © E.G.D.)

A budding collection (Photo © E.G.D.)

They’re colorful, they’re cute, and they’re smooth and shiny from being tumbled in the bay.  Also, we really enjoyed collecting them, and I have resolved to find a tiny salt shaker to put them in for display.

The moral of the experience?  One beach-goer’s large grain of sand is another beach-goer’s new tiny rock!  Have a great day, preferably at the beach ^_^ -E.G.D.

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Gulf of Mexico Beaches | Tagged: , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Magical Bora Bora and Motu Haapiti

Posted by E.G.D. on March 29, 2015

Take every shade of blue and of green that you have ever seen or even imagined. Swirl them together and you have the astonishing kaleidoscope of brilliant colors that makes up the island of Bora Bora. Now, take those colors along with purples, golds, yellows, and oranges and you now have Bora Bora’s phenomenal underwater wonderland. That having been said, words cannot possibly describe Bora Bora. Photos simply don’t do it justice.

Sunrise in Bora Bora (Photo © Jody Diehl)

Sunrise in Bora Bora (Photo © Jody Diehl)

We had stunning views as we sailed in just as the sun was rising behind the island. Greg and I were the first of the ship’s passengers on the first tender to shore where we set about exploring the little village of Vaitape. I do believe we actually experienced the town’s morning rush hour. Cars came and went up the narrow main (barely two lane) street.  Everyone smiles and greets you in Bora Bora. Their homeland is their pride and joy. Here English is more frequently spoken amongst the locals than on Tahiti. [Editor’s Note: Jody and Greg didn’t make it to a beach on Tahiti for reasons of time and a language barrier, so I didn’t turn their e-love-letter to Tahiti into a post- E.G.D.] We had a full day excursion planned and started out at 9:00 with a sail around the island. First stop: swimming with the sharks and rays at a shallow reef. What an experience! The guides enticed both the sharks and rays to come closer. Some of the black tip sharks were easily five feet in length. They came out of every direction and you never knew when one would appear underneath or passing right next to you. The same was true for the rays (also quite large). Neither seemed to care that we were sharing the water with them. We cared plenty and were exceedingly grateful for their kind hospitality! Next stop: the coral gardens where the water was quite a bit deeper. The brilliantly colorful coral gardens were teeming with life.

Next stop: a private island where we enjoyed a picnic lunch, music, dancing, the most thorough and entertaining coconut demonstration ever, and more time for swimming and snorkeling. Motu Haapiti has the most startling crystal clear water we have ever, ever seen. Just imagine swimming in bottled water. Actually, the entire lagoon around Bora Bora is this clear. It was only more obvious at the shallow beach surrounding Motu Haapiti. [Editor’s Note: This set of photos actually includes some beach shots, which is how I justified posting this! -E.G.D.]

During the entire day of sailing around the tiny island we enjoyed Polynesian music and songs from our joyful crew. Bora Bora is the place of dreams. Please don’t pinch me!!! Today we will cross back over the equator and arrive once again in the northern hemisphere. Next stop: Hilo, Hawaii-  Jody & Greg

Posted in Beaches of the South Pacific | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Picture Perfect: Rarotonga, Cook Islands

Posted by E.G.D. on March 24, 2015

We had another fabulous port of call, this time at Rarotonga, the youngest of the Cook Islands. Rarotonga is the picture perfect setting you would imagine finding on a postcard of the South Pacific. Only better! Rarotonga’s natural beauty is stunning. The island’s rugged, eroded volcanic peaks are covered in dense, green vegetation. And sparkling blue lagoons are surrounded by pearly white sand and tall, swaying palm trees. Picture perfect!

The hot and steamy day (even for the locals) started with a trip to Muri Lagoon, the go-to spot for snorkeling on the island. There we found colorful fish, coral, and black sea cucumbers galore. The water was crystal clear and cool. The currents were pretty tricky, pulling us this way and that. We just decided to head up the white sandy beach and then let the current take us back to the nearby beachside resort. It worked pretty well, but there was a whole lot of kicking involved!

We shuttled back into town in the afternoon, hoping the shops and cafes might be open. They weren’t. Rarotonga is a Christian community and Sunday is a day for church, and rest, and family. We walked through the tiny midtown area and turned up a street and into a neighborhood where we found a monument on a triangle of road. It was the stone from which the first Christian sermon was given on the island. It read: “On this stone Papeiha first preached the Christian message in Rarotonga in 1823.” Cool find for just walking up a side street! There were many churches tucked away all along the main road. The sign in front of Saint Joseph’s Catholic Cathedral showed that the 9:00 AM Sunday mass is said in Maori.

Island life is relaxed, patient, and accepting. Each person we met on Rarotonga was joyful and very friendly. It was a full day of fun and exploration.

Next stop: Tahiti.

We hope all is well with all of you.

Have a wonderful yesterday!- Jody & Greg

Posted in Beaches of the South Pacific | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

 
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