Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches

One Shell of a Find!

  • Like us on Facebook!

  • Come Join Us! Treasure Hunters

  • Copyright Notice

    The contents of this site are copyright Beach Treasures And Treasure Beaches.com and may not be copied or used without written permission from the Beach Treasures And Treasure Beaches staff. The posts may be quoted in part, so long as credit is given where it is due and so long as you link the quote back to this page. Thank you kindly for your cooperation and for your interest in our passion for beaches.
    ©2011-2017 Beach Treasures And Treasure Beaches.com.
    All Rights Reserved.

  • Disclaimer

    Links to third-party websites are provided as a convenience to users; Beach Treasures And Treasure Beaches.com does not control or endorse their content.

Archive for the ‘Atlantic Coast Beaches’ Category

The Ghosts of Jekyll Island

Posted by Jody on October 28, 2017

As soon as Mary and I entered the clearing at the end of the access path to Driftwood Beach, we had an overwhelming feeling of otherworldliness. It was an eerie sensation -which took a little while to shake off- as we gazed on the haunting skeletons and sun-bleached bones and of oak and pine trees past. We had entered a forest graveyard.

DriftwoodBeach9

Driftwood Beach

Life (and more recently hurricanes) had gotten in the way of our usual pre-trip homework. We had expected actual driftwood -bits and pieces of wood that had washed ashore- scattered about a stretch of shoreline named Driftwood Beach, but that is certainly not what we found!

As Anthony (Tony) J. Martin, author of Life Traces of the Georgia Coast (Indiana University Press), succinctly explains in his blog post Doing Field Work on a Developed Barrier Island:

“At the north end of Jekyll, shoreline erosion has caused the beach and maritime forest to meet, and the forest is losing to the beach. This has caused the forest to become what is often nicknamed a “tree boneyard,” in which trees die and either stay upright or fall in the same spot where they once practiced their photosynthetic ways.”

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This scenic “cemetery” is a must-see any day of the year!  Climbing seems to be the favorite pass-time for kids, while adults sling hammocks on the gnarled branches. Stargazing is the ultimate choice for a romantic evening beneath the heavens. Driftwood Beach is likely the most explored and photographed stretch of beach on the Jekyll Island.

Off the beach, human ghost stories abound on this Golden Isle. Sightings are apparently common enough in the historic district, including the Jekyll Island Club Resort, which boasts a rich history of supernatural appearances – from a uniformed bellman performing his duties to a long gone railroad magnate who still evidently cannot begin his day without a cup of coffee and the morning newspaper. In the evening, after you’ve enjoyed a day of  beach explorations, you can join the “world famous” Jekyll Island Trolley Ghost Tour for legends and tales from beyond the grave. If you do, let us know how it goes!

JekyllIslandClubResort

Jekyll Island Club Resort

~~~~~~~~~~~

Anthony Martin: Life Traces of the Georgia Coast

Related Halloween Links:

A Halloween Tale: Beware the Excirolana kincaidi!

The Graveyard of the Pacific: The Bones of the Peter Iredale

 

Advertisements

Posted in Atlantic Coast Beaches, Holiday, Sand and Shoreline | Tagged: , , , | 6 Comments »

Jekyll Island’s Gems

Posted by Jody on October 15, 2017

20170930_093032

Knobbed Whelks

Just a couple of weeks ago, soon after Tropical Storm Irma’s 6-foot storm surge wreaked havoc on Jekyll Island, I visited this “Golden Isle” for a much anticipated girl trip. A dear life-long friend and I met in the Jacksonville (JAX) airport, rented a car, and drove the easy-peasy route north to Georgia’s little island paradise. The storm had done quite a bit of damage to many of the beach crossovers and it had devastated the protective dunes, but the state owned barrier island was in the process of returning to normal and was once again open for business.

Jekyll Island after Tropical Storm Irma ©Jody Diehl

Jekyll Island after Tropical Storm Irma

Over the long weekend, when the tide was low enough to barefoot it on the sandy seashore, we spent a great deal of time walking and catching up on the spectacular beaches of Jekyll Island (Mary’s Fitbit kept track and recorded our steps at 30+ miles!). Sand dollars were easily spotted dotting the shoreline but the grand prize of beachcombing on this fabulous weekend was hands down the Knobbed Whelk, Georgia’s Official State Seashell.  They had been flung up into the rip-rap in abundance by Irma.

Beach treasures found on Jekyll Island after Tropical Storm Irma ©Jody Diehl

Beach Treasures found on Jekyll Island after Tropical Storm Irma

Our first sighting of these Jekyll Island gems happened when we spotted a family -looking very pleased indeed – coming towards us with armloads of something we couldn’t quite figure out. We just knew we had to ask! They were finding perfect Knobbed Whelk specimens hand over fist in the boulders piled along the dunes. They even happily shared some of their bounty with us! Afterwards, being on high alert to spot some of our own one-of-a-kind beach treasures, we began to see Knobbed Whelks partially buried in the sand just at the rolling surf line.

Knobbed Whelk ©Jody Diehl

Knobbed Whelk found on Jekyll Island, Georgia

The Knobbed Whelk, as Jekyll Island’s “Your Official Guide” (Fall/Winter 2017) states, “… is the state shell of both Georgia and New Jersey. These big snails are a fairly common animal found along the intertidal beaches and marshes of Jekyll Island.” It goes on to say, “Feel free to take these shells as a souvenir, but only if they’re uninhabited.” The largest one we snagged was over 5 1/2 inches in length but they can grow up to 9 inches long. Also known to more scientific minds as “Busycon Carica,” they range from Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to Cape Canaveral, Florida. Our finds were everywhere on the color scale from light grey-brown (some being streaked with darker browns) to a very dark grey. The low knobs on the shells’ shoulders are a bit of a giveaway but an important fact in identifying a Knobbed Whelk is that the opening of the Knobbed Whelk’s shell is on the right. The Lightning Whelk, on the other hand, is a south paw!

~~~~~~~~~

Any ideas on where we should go for our next girls only weekend?

                                 We’d love to hear from you!                       

If you’d like to learn more about the Knobbed Whelk, I suggest this helpful site: Chesapeake Bay Program.

 

 

Posted in Atlantic Coast Beaches, Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Seashells | Tagged: , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

Loving Lewes Beach, Delaware

Posted by E.G.D. on August 14, 2017

Today’s featured guest writer is Audrey Dautenhahn.

LewesBeach

Photo courtesy of Audrey Dautenhahn

While I was born in the southwest, I grew up visiting various California beaches and experiencing the beauty of the Pacific Ocean. Now, I live in the northeast, and I’m getting to explore an entirely different set of seashores. Lewes Beach in Delaware is fabulous–so fabulous, in fact, that I only managed to snap a couple of photos!

LewesBeach2

Photo courtesy of Audrey Dautenhahn

Our idea to visit the shore was not original, and the beach was busy on a Saturday morning in the middle of summer, but we found a nice spot to place our umbrella. A sandbar extended out from the shoreline, and my kids could wade out several yards from shore. We enjoyed watching the Cape May Lewes Ferry make trips over to New Jersey, and wagons would pass by, offering water ice for sale. (We took them up on their offer, and it was delicious.)

This is a really nice family beach, and I know that we will return. (But first, there are more beaches to visit!)

About today’s featured guest writer:  Audrey Dautenhahn is a freelance writer and super-mom home school teacher.  She is passionate about writing urban fantasy love stories like her novel, Look and See, which was released in 2015, and she is currently working on the second book in her Acts of Valar series.  She lives in Pennsylvania with her husband and four children.

Posted in Atlantic Coast Beaches, Beaches of North America, Featured Guest Writer | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

Greetings from Long Island New York!

Posted by Jody on July 3, 2015

Today’s Featured Guest Writer is native New Yorker Maggie Soukeras.

Greetings from Long Island New York!

Summer is upon us and its time for pools, bbq’s and the beach!

After the long and cold winter it has been great to be able to get outside – take long walks on the beach and start collecting shells again!

A favorite pass time of mine from childhood and into middle age – collecting shells has been both relaxing and exciting at the same time.  It is like a treasure hunt that can bring you into an almost Zen like state during the search!

Point Lookout Beach, Long Island, New York. Photo by Maggie Soukeras

Point Lookout Beach, Long Island, New York. Photo by Maggie Soukeras

My long time haunts have been on the beaches of Long Island.  As a Pisces I could not imagine growing up anywhere but near the Ocean.  Point Lookout and Long Beach were always the places that I have visited and you can find some great shells.  Sometimes it is easy and sometimes requires a little work! This fall I found a sand dollar for the first time ever on a Long Island Beach!

Point Lookout Beach Treasures. Photo by Maggie Soukeras

Point Lookout Beach Treasures. Check out Maggies sand dollar find! Photo by Maggie Soukeras

I have also had success on Shelter Island.  It has been a while since I have been there but we found some great stuff kayaking out to this little island with an abandoned home.

If you like rocks – the north shore of the island is rockier than the south shore.  Head out east – visit the beaches, farms stands, and plethora of wineries!

Off Long Island, my favorite hunting spots have been on Eagle Beach in Aruba, Bermuda, St.Barts,  Barbados (Maxwell Beach) and Florida!   My dream is to make it to Sanibel Island, though I fear I may need to bring an extra bag for all of the shells I imagine I would find there!

Eagle Beach on Aruba. Photo by Maggie Soukeras

Eagle Beach on Aruba. Photo by Maggie Soukeras

To all of the happy shellers out there – keep looking – you are never too old or young to go hunting for shells!

Enjoy the summer!

Maggie

About the Author: Maggie Soukeras is a native New Yorker living on Long Island with her husband Dean and their three cats Patsy, Loretta and Dolly.  Growing up on an island and being a Pisces, she always loved the ocean and collecting shells, one of her favorite hobbies!  When she is not collecting shells, Maggie teaches yoga and manages a yoga studio in Oyster Bay. She has worked with children and adults of all ages and abilities.  Maggie enjoys sharing her love of yoga with others, reading a good book, and long walks on the beach with her husband.  

A note from our Treasure Hunters:

We simply love to share when it comes to beaches, treasure hunting, beachcombing crafts, and beachy tips. How about you? Do you have a favorite beach you’d like to share with us? Maybe you have some great tips for beach picnics, seaside safety, or seashore activities. Please check out our Submission Guidelines for info on jumping into the fun at Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches.  You may be our next Featured Guest Writer!

Posted in Atlantic Coast Beaches, Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Featured Guest Writer, Seashells | Tagged: , , , , , | 5 Comments »

New York City Beaches Make the Grade!

Posted by Jody on May 5, 2014

A while back, Greg and I visited New York City to attend a fabulous wedding at Terrace on the Park in Queens. Having decided to make a vacation out of the long trip from Albuquerque, we squeezed in some of the typical touristy stuff. You know, enjoying the hubbub in Times Square, strolling across the Brooklyn Bridge, taking a ride on the Staten Island Ferry, going to a ballgame. There is so much to do and see in New York City. The one thing we couldn’t miss, of course, was a trip to a Big Apple beach! The bride and groom highly recommended Rockaway Beach, the city’s only surfing beach, in the borough of Queens. So… we checked with our handy, reliable HopStop phone app, hopped on the bus, and set out to enjoy the day! And enjoy the day we did.

Rockaway Beach, Queens, New York City

Rockaway Beach, Queens, New York City

Rockaway Beach is a beautiful stretch of sand that was strewn with super sized Atlantic Surf Clam (Spisula solidissima) seashells the day of our visit. And I mean they were huge! NOAA‘s FishWatch site says that Atlantic Surf Clams are “the largest bivalves in the western North Atlantic.” They actually range all the way from Nova Scotia to South Carolina. These popular beach treasures can grow to over 7 inches across, making them the perfect soap dishes!

Seashell hunting was no challenge. The real challenge and fun of the day was the friendly beachcombing competition to find the most jumbo seashell specimen we could. It was a win-win day!

Rockaway Beach (Atlantic Surf Clam in the Foreground)

Rockaway Beach (Atlantic Surf Clam in the Foreground)

Running the length of the beach was  a well-kept boardwalk with maintained public restrooms. It’s easy to see by the early morning activity that Rockaway Beach is indeed one of New York City’s most popular beaches.  This favored municipal beach rated a “very good” in the 2011 biennial survey compiled by the advocacy group New Yorkers for Parks. Along with Rockaway Beach, Coney Island also rated “very good.” (In the survey, no beaches were rated “unsatisfactory,” as was the case for a couple of beaches in the previous two reporting surveys.) It’s always nice to bring home a good report card!

Rockaway Beach Boardwalk (Pre-Superstorm Sandy)

Rockaway Beach Boardwalk (Pre-Superstorm Sandy)

As you can imagine, in October of 2012, Superstorm Sandy caused great damage to New York City’s coastal areas, boardwalks, and beaches. Happily, progress is being made in the restoration of Rockaway Beach. In an April 2014 update, The New York City Department of Parks & Recreation announced:

“After Hurricane Sandy, more than $140 million was invested to repair and restore Rockaway Beach. As part of this work, intact sections of boardwalk were repaired, damaged beach buildings were renovated with new boardwalk islands constructed around them, public restrooms and lifeguard stations were installed to replace destroyed facilities, and interim shoreline protection and anti-erosion measures were created. Thanks to this work, more than 3 million people visited Rockaway Beach throughout the 2013 beach season.”

 ♪ ♫ “Start spreading the news…” ♪ ♫ New York City’s beaches are Grade A!

~~~

 Do you have a favorite New York City beach?  We’d love to hear about it!

Posted in Atlantic Coast Beaches, Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Monday Miscellaneous, Seashells | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

I love a good mystery!

Posted by Jody on March 27, 2014

I just love finding pottery shards and stoneware bits on the beach! And I love a good mystery!

Put them together and we’ve got the perfect beach treasure mystery to solve:

Eva Dodsworth found this small piece of pottery on the beach 15 miles south of St. Augustine Beach, Florida, recently. She says: “I’m trying to figure out the history of it. It looks like it may be from the 1800s? I’m not too familiar with pottery patterns but my research shows that perhaps is British transferware?”

“Does anybody know? Thanks!”

A piece of pottery found a few miles south of St. Augustine during low tide at 29 42'17.59"N 81 3'29.18W. I'm thinking 1860s British Transferware?

“A piece of pottery found a few miles south of St. Augustine during low tide at 29 42’17.59″N 81 3’29.18W. I’m thinking 1860s British Transferware?”

~~~

Well, what do you think? Do you recognize this pattern? We’d love to hear from you!

~~~

Posted in Atlantic Coast Beaches, Beach Treasures - Beachcombing | Tagged: , , , | 12 Comments »

A GHOST CRAB’S DAY AT THE SEASIDE AT DELPHI, ABACO

Posted by Jody on February 1, 2014

It’s just another gorgeous day at the beach for this little critter!

ROLLING HARBOUR ABACO

Crab, Delphi Club Beach, Abaco

A GHOST CRAB’S DAY AT THE SEASIDE AT DELPHI, ABACO

Crabby the Crab lived amongst the greenery at the very back of the Delphi Club BeachGhost Crab Delphi Beach 1

It was a very beautiful beach indeed. Lucky Crabby!Delphi Beach + Shell

One day Crabby decided to go down to the sea for a swimGhost Crab Delphi Beach 2

He scuttled across the sand towards the sound of the wavesGhost Crab Delphi Beach 3

He passed the burrow of his friend Sandy. Sandy was very busy tidying his house.Ghost Crab Delphi Beach 4

“Would you like to come for a paddle?” asked Crabby. “No thanks”, said Sandy, “I’m busy today”Ghost Crab Delphi Beach 5

So Crabby carried on towards the water’s edge. He got closer, to where the sand was wet…Ghost Crab Delphi Beach 6

…and closer, to where the water tickled his toes…Ghost Crab Delphi Beach 7

…and closer, to where the tide ripples reached.  Crabby waved his claws with excitementGhost Crab Delphi Beach 8

Finally, he was paddling in the warm water. It was just perfect. Whoops! Don’t fall in, Crabby!Ghost Crab Delphi Beach 9

Very soon…

View original post 60 more words

Posted in Atlantic Coast Beaches, Beach and Coastal Wildlife | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

Indian River Lagoon

Posted by E.G.D. on November 15, 2013

Today’s Featured Guest Writer is Doug Raymond:

While talking about Florida’s beautiful beaches, we can’t overlook one of nature’s coastal treasures, the Indian River Lagoon. It is home to many species of plants and animals, including sea turtles and manatees. Visitors and residents alike should take a few hours to drive the Indian River Lagoon National Scenic Byway and stop to enjoy its majestic beauty.

Indian River Lagoon (photo by Doug Raymond)

Indian River Lagoon (photo by Doug Raymond)

What is a Lagoon?

A lagoon is a shallow body of water that is separated from the ocean by islands that parallel the shoreline. Small inlets allow water to come in and out of the lagoon. There are three different types of lagoons called leaky, chokes, and restricted. The Indian River Lagoon is a restricted lagoon which means that it has multiple channels to the ocean and a good circulation of water coming in and out.

Plants in the Indian River Lagoon

According to the Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce website, “the lagoon’s habitats support more than 3,500 documented species of animals, plants, fungi and protists.” The Sea Rosemary and the Caribbean Apple Cactus are just two of the many endangered plant species that are able to thrive in this habitat. Other plants in the estuary include mosses, a variety of ferns, and many types of grasses. There is ample opportunity to take pictures while you enjoy the simple beauty of the plants, and you can enjoy their unique aromas when visiting the lagoon.

Animals Living in the Lagoon

Favorite residents of the lagoon are the playful dolphins and majestic manatees that inhabit the area. Hundreds of bottle-nose dolphins from various dolphin communities call this place home. Sea turtles, many different lizards, and the endangered American Alligator are just a few of the reptilian residents at Indian River Lagoon. Sharks, sting rays, and otters reside here too. You may even spot a black bear. It is home to many animals, including both those that are endangered and those with thriving populations. The lagoon provides a specific and unique environment.

Florida's Abundant Wildlife

Florida’s Abundant Coastal Wildlife

Enhancing the Space Coast Lifestyle

 If you love the outdoors and ocean life, then you will love the Indian River Lagoon. All east Florida residents should take the opportunity to visit this estuary. Although it is beautiful and provides a home to many animals, it is fragile and sees the occasional threat like plant overgrowth.  It can also sometimes suffer from pollution. It is important to enjoy nature’s treasure, but also to keep in mind that it must be respected. If you’re just a visitor, or one of the lucky people who get to call Florida home, don’t miss out on this gem.

About the author: Doug Raymond grew up in Idaho, and has worked in and around home construction and real estate for most of his life. He is interested in home building, construction, architecture, interior design, landscaping, green living, writing, blogging, internet marketing, sports, and the outdoors.

~~~

A note from our treasure hunters:

We simply love to share when it comes to beaches, treasure hunting, beachcombing crafts, and beachy tips. How about you? Do you have a favorite beach you’d like to share with us? Maybe you have some great tips for beach picnics, seaside safety, or seashore activities. Please check out our Submission Guidelines for info on jumping into the fun at Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches.  You may be our next Featured Guest Writer!

Posted in Atlantic Coast Beaches, Beach and Coastal Wildlife, Featured Guest Writer | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

SHORE THINGS: BEACHCOMBING ON A PRISTINE ABACO BEACH

Posted by Jody on June 17, 2013

What a wonderful way to start the week! Let’s grab our sunhats and go…

ROLLING HARBOUR ABACO

Shore Things 16

SHORE THINGS: BEACHCOMBING ON A PRISTINE ABACO BEACH

The Abaco bay known as Rolling Harbour is a 3/4 mile curve of white sand beach, protected by an off-shore reef. The beach is pristine. Or it would be but for two factors. One is the seaweed that arrives when the wind is from the east – natural and biodegradable detritus. It provides food and camouflage for many species of shorebird – plover and sandpipers of all varieties from large to least. The second – far less easily dealt with – is the inevitable plastic junk washed up on every tide. This has to be collected up and ‘binned’, a never-ending cycle of plastic trash disposal. Except for the ATLAS V SPACE-ROCKET FAIRING found on the beach, that came from the Mars ‘Curiosity’ launch. Sandy's Mystery Object

We kept is as a… curiosity, until it was eventually removed by the men in black…

Shore Things 14I’d intended…

View original post 252 more words

Posted in Atlantic Coast Beaches, Beach and Coastal Wildlife, Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Monday Miscellaneous, Sand and Shoreline, Seashells | Tagged: , , , | 2 Comments »

Sea turtle Nesting Season and How to Protect Our Beaches

Posted by Jody on May 7, 2013

  • It is against the law to touch or disturb nesting sea turtles, hatchlings, or their nests.
  • If you see an injured or dead sea turtle, call the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission 1-888-404-FWCC (3922) or *FWC from your cell phone.
  • Avoid going to the beach at night. If you must be on the beach at night, limit your walking and do not use flashlights or flash photography.
  • Turn off outside patio lights and shield indoor lights from shining directly onto the beach by closing the drapes at night. Lights disturb nesting sea turtles and hatchlings.
  • While enjoying the beautiful beaches during the day, avoid disturbing marked sea turtle nests, and please take your trash with when you leave the beach.
  • When crossing a dune, please use designated cross overs and walk ways. Do not climb over the dunes or disturb the dune vegetation.
  • Interested in taking a guided sea turtle hike? Here’s a list of organizations permitted by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to conduct public turtle watches.

The sea turtle nesting season runs from May 1-October 1.

Florida’s Space Coast is located 35 miles east of Orlando on Florida’s Atlantic Coast. With over than 72 miles of sandy beaches, the Space Coast is the “gateway to the stars, home of East Coast surfing and the world’s second busiest port.”

I Need My Space

The first of May officially marked the beginning of the sea turtle nesting season in the state of Florida.  Although we want people to come to Florida’s Space Coast to enjoy our beaches, we also want residents and visitors to be aware that they’re not the only ones out there.

To ensure the survival of sea turtles, but still enjoy yourself on our coast here’s a short list of things to remember during sea turtle season:

  • It is against the law to touch or disturb nesting sea turtles, hatchlings, or their nests.
  • If you see an injured or dead sea turtle, call the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission 1-888-404-FWCC (3922) or *FWC from your cell phone.
  • Avoid going to the beach at night. If you must be on the beach at night, limit your walking and do not use flashlights or flash photography.
  • Turn off outside patio lights and shield…

View original post 106 more words

Posted in Atlantic Coast Beaches, Beach and Coastal Wildlife, Sea Turtles, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , | 4 Comments »

 
%d bloggers like this: