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Archive for the ‘Tallies & Tips’ Category

Does this mean I’m a shellebrity?

Posted by Jody on July 12, 2016

shellguide

Visual Guide to Collecting Seashells on Florida’s Beaches!

Earlier this year, I was very surprised to find a copy of the beautiful, laminated Visual Guide to Collecting Seashells on Florida’s Beaches on the floor of my daughter’s car. Well, actually I wasn’t surprised that something was on the floor of the family mini-van, but it was definitely a shock to see my very own seashell photos inside the brochure. No kidding! I had been asked to help out with a seashell guide layout last year that I knew was for VisitFlorida.com. What I didn’t know is that it was going to be printed, laminated, and available for any and all travelers to pick up at the Florida Welcome Center! (Silly me, I thought it was going to be an online shelling reference guide. Must have been the “.com” that tripped me up.)

So, the next time Greg and I visited Florida, we stopped in at the Florida Welcome Center which is some 6 miles west of Pensacola on I-10. There we found stacks and stacks of the Visual Guide to Collecting Seashells, in all its glory – showcased everywhere from the Atlantic beaches brochure racks all the way around to the Gulf Coast shelves!

My photographs of bubble seashells, calico scallops, moon snails, a Florida fighting conch, and more – all inside! There is even a special recognition and thank you for me in the credits on the reverse side of the brochure.  I couldn’t possibly be more pleased!

Be sure to stop in and get your free copy of the shelling guide the next time you are traveling through the Sunshine State, and use the handy-dandy checklist inside to keep track of your new found beach treasures.

So, what do you think? Does this mean I’m a shellebrity now? 😉

~~~

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Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Seashells, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Beach Rules

Posted by Jody on June 1, 2016

Posted in Beach Safety Tips, Tallies & Tips, Today's Special | Tagged: , , , | 4 Comments »

How-tos.

Posted by Jody on May 23, 2016

There is a camaraderie among beach treasure hunters in Venice, Florida, that charms folks into returning over and over again.  Locals and repeat visitors are quick to lend a hand along with plenty of advice. Perfect strangers will plop a load or two of scooped up seashells onto the sand in front of you to get you started. I’ve seen more than one longtime treasure hunter simply pick up a shark tooth on the sand and gift it to someone they’ve never met before. Everyone has a system of finding the treasured shark teeth on the shores of Venice. Some of us have a whole beach bag full of how-tos.

Here are a few tips, tricks, and how-tos we’ve learned along the way. They’re all tried and true!

1.The Dig and Sift

The Dig and Sift is accomplished by simply reaching into the water to get the biggest portion of settled shells possible, then sifting through the seashells and fragments in hopes of spotting the perfect shark tooth specimen. You can buy a fancy pants scooper (sold at the local Walmarts for just under $18.00) which is simply a little wire basket on a pole. Folks ’round here have been known to attach a kitchen sieve to a $1.00 thrift store golf club to achieve the same results. Clever! Right? The cheapest bet: scoop with your own two hands, although you should plan on chipping the polish off of any prettily manicured nails. (Come to think of it, this may indeed be the most expensive option of the three!)

DSCF3067

The Dig and Sift

2. The Sweep and Trap

The Sweep and Trap system doesn’t require braving the surf. You just need to find a section of the beach where the surf is washing over a patch of smallish seashell fragments. Crouch on the sand and start to run your hand back and forth across the small bits and pieces while the surf comes and goes. Now, with this system, you’ll likely see a treasure or two get away before you can actually grab what really did look like a shark tooth. Hence the “trap” part. Quick reflexes are necessary to trap any dark, suspicious form before the waves wash your suspected precious beach treasure back into the sea.

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The Sweep and Trap

3. The Scoop and Toss

Can’t find a place where the waves are washing across a section of seashell fragments? Have a friend simply scoop a colander, bucket, or basket of seashells and sand from the water and plop the load along the surf line for you. Follow the “trap” part of technique #2 from here.

4. The Dig Like Heck at the Shell Banks Left Behind After High Tide

🙂 Self explanatory:

DSCF3090

The Dig Like Heck at the Shell Banks Left Behind After High Tide

5. The Walk and Scan

Enjoy a lovely walk on the beach and just look down. I can’t tell you how successful this system has been for many a beach treasure hunter on the beautiful beaches of Venice. Yes, this how-to is too obvious, but we just had to mention it!

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The Walk and Scan

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The Ultimate Venice Beach Treasure!

Good luck & have a wonderful day at the beach!!

~~~~~~

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Gulf of Mexico Beaches, Sand and Shoreline, Seashells, Sharks, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

Beach Metal Detecting: 5 Tips to Get the Most Out of Your Hunt

Posted by Jody on August 17, 2014

Today’s Featured Writer is Glenn Stock.

Beach Metal Detecting on the Gulf Coast

Beach Metal Detecting on the Gulf Coast

Beach metal detecting is a fun outdoor hobby that can also be very profitable. What makes it so great is the opportunity to explore new areas along with the anticipation of a great find. Beaches are some of the most popular places to explore. You not only get the chance to find lost valuables but you also get to enjoy the great beach weather.

Many a beach metal detecting hobbyist has paid for his/her metal detector, and more, from just a few hours or so of metal detecting. You can too!

Metal Detecting on GalvestonBbeach at the Seawall (Across from Fort Crockett Park)

Metal Detecting on Galveston Beach at the Seawall (Across from Fort Crockett Park)

 

Tip #1: Slow down and have fun.
Remember, this metal detecting hobby is all about having fun. It’s easy to move too fast and just skim across an area believing there are no treasures below the sand – but slowing your search down will improve your odds of finding something. There are times when it may take you forever to find just one thing, but making sure to slow down and appreciate the hobby makes it all the more worthwhile.

Tip #2: Timing
Picking the best time to search the beach is an important factor in getting the beach to reveal its hidden treasures. The perfect time is when most everyone has left. This gives you a greater area to search, and you won’t have so many interruptions, either. When there aren’t as many people around, you can explore closer to the shore and even more remote areas, greatly improving your chances of discovering something valuable. Get up early. Making an early start (before anyone else arrives) is another great time to explore the beach.

Tip #3: Get Dirty
Don’t be afraid to sift through the sand; you have to get your detector close enough to sense something. Often the most prized treasures can be buried just below the surface. So get your hands dirty and start going through everything.

Tip #4: Be Prepared
Time can fly by quickly when you are intensely focused on finding that treasure. Make sure you pack something to eat (high energy bars are good) and also something to drink to keep those energy levels up throughout the day. Also remember to pack a hat, sun-glasses and some sunscreen to protect you from getting sun burnt on those hot days.

Most of all, be sure to be courteous and respectful of others. When everyone shows each other respect, everyone has fun, and the hobby never becomes a burden. Beach metal detecting isn’t only for discovering hidden treasure but also for fun and adventure, so go on, get out, and have some beach metal detecting fun in the sun.

Beach Metal Detecting

Beach Metal Detecting

About the Author: Glenn Stock has, for the last 20 years has been detecting along the Gulf Coast beaches and shallows, along with old historic homes site, civil war camps, parks, fairgrounds and just about any other place throughout the South that’s not covered with pavement. In between detecting trips he manages and writes for TreasureHunterDepot.com and is employed by The State of Texas. Follow Glenn’s tips and check out the following link to stay ahead of the curve: Beach and Shallow Water Metal Detecting.

~~~

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Featured Guest Writer, Sand and Shoreline, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , | 11 Comments »

Beach Metal Detecting: 5 Metal Detector Maintenance Tips to Get the Most Out of Your Machine

Posted by Jody on June 2, 2014

Today’s Featured Guest Writer is Michael Bernzweig.

When you invest in a metal detector it’s important to care for it properly so you can get as much use out of it as possible. To help, we’ve compiled this list of metal detector maintenance tips so you can be sure you’re taking care of your machine correctly for years of trouble free treasure hunting.

Metal Detecting in Rockport, Texas

Metal Detecting in Rockport, Texas

Use a Carrying Case

Keeping your machine in a protective carrying case whenever it’s not in use ensures that it will stay safe and dry. You may also want to consider an additional cover for the search coil to further protect this very sensitive piece of your metal detector.

Clean Your Metal Detector After Each Use

Keeping your machine clean is essential. Metal detectors can become quite dirty out in the field, especially when treasure hunting at the beach or in the salt water. Using a soft rag and/or toothbrush you can be sure all the dirt, sand, and other particles are out of all the nooks and crannies of your machine where they can cause a range of different problems.

Remove the Batteries Before Storage

Before you store your machine, always take the batteries out. Removing the batteries before storing your metal detector is important so they don’t get corroded in the machine. Plus, it helps you keep them charged so they’re ready when you need them.

Metal Detecting in Santa Cruz, California

Metal Detecting in Santa Cruz, California

Store in a Cool, Dry Place

Be sure to avoid extreme temperatures when storing your metal detector. This means, for example, don’t leave it in the back of your car, or in the garage. Instead, choose a closet or other environment that feels comfortable to you and doesn’t experience intense temperature fluctuations. Also, make sure wherever you store your metal detector is dry as well. For some this will mean not storing their machine in the basement, either! Damp, humid conditions can rob your machine of years of proper functioning, so find a nice dry space to store your metal detector for best results.

Test Your Metal Detector Regularly

To help your metal detector perform its best, and verify that there are no mechanical issues you need to attend to, you’ll want to test your machine regularly. Your metal detector instruction manual may have some advice on testing your specific detector. We generally just hunt known targets in order to calibrate the machine and help us ensure everything is in working order. Testing the headphones and other accessories this way is important too.

These metal detector maintenance tips are very simple, yet, if they’re not performed regularly, a variety of complex problems can result. So, instead of having to pay for repairs or even a new metal detector, be sure to give your current machine some regular TLC and it’ll be finding you treasures for years to come.

About the Author: Michael Bernzweig manages MetalDetector.com in Southborough, MA. He has written on the subject of treasure hunting and metal detecting since the mid 1980’s. He enjoys traveling with his metal detector and helping to educate others in the correct use of metal detectors in their explorations.

Helpful links: What are the best metal detectors for metal detecting on the beach?

Safe, Fun, and Successful Beach Metal Detecting!

~~~

 

 

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Featured Guest Writer, Sand and Shoreline, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , , , | 7 Comments »

The Maunder Taylor Family’s Excellent Adventure

Posted by Jody on May 17, 2014

The Coastal Path is one of my very favorite blogs. It chronicles the explorations and light-hearted shenanigans of the Maunder Taylor family as they travel on foot along the coast of Britain. I like it partly because Greg and I hope to hike Britain’s seaside trails in the not-too-distant future. But mostly I enjoy reading The Coastal Path because it’s just plain fun to tag along with this close-knit wayfaring clan on their frequent coastal jaunts. 

Recently, I asked Nic (Dad and blogger) for his tips on undertaking a walk around the coast of Britain. I was thrilled when not only he, but each one of his family members, chimed in with their own witty words of advice!

 Today’s Featured Guest Writers are Nic, Deb, Ben, and Catherine Maunder Taylor!

The  Maunder Taylor at Boscombe

The Maunder Taylor Family at Boscombe

Nic told me that he first had the idea of walking the coast of Britain 20 years ago but didn’t act on it. He went on to make a career, eventually joined the family business, and settled down into a life of working during the week. He then spent his weekends “half waiting for the week to start again.” 

      After about 10 years of this I turned 40 and had what I call a “healthy mid-life wobble”. It wasn’t a crisis by any means – just an appropriately timed self-correction.  For some reason (I have no idea why) I declared I wanted to go to Southend Pier on my birthday. We went on some rides (I went upside down on a roller coaster for the first time since I was 15) and took a walk up the pier.  We went on a tall ship that happened to be moored at there and had coffee. I remembered the dream I’d had when I was younger.

     For a couple of months I thought quietly about things and then suggested it to my wife. She thought I was quite bonkers and preferred the “one step at a time” approach, agreeing to do a walk if I could convince the kids. Convince the kids?!?!?  That was EASY!

     “Hey you two!” I shouted, “If you come for a walk with us we’ll do ice cream and roller coasters at Southend!”

     “Yay!” they shouted!

     Oh, my poor children! Little did they realise what they were saying yes to!

Beachcombing on the British Coast

Beachcombing on the British Coast

How do you get a family of four to walk around the coast of Britain?  This is one of the toughest exercises known to humankind.  It is no mistake that DHL offers no such service within their menu of logistical offerings.

What follows are the informed views of four people who, most weekends, do exactly this:

Nic (Aged 42) –  Equipment stockman, driver and mule, carrying anything and everything put into his backpack by anyone and everyone else.

Deb (Aged 42) – The person most likely to put anything and everything into Nic’s backpack.  The person most likely to insist we return home 10 minutes after setting out because she left something out.

Ben (Aged 11) – The person most likely to complain that out of everything put in his father’s backpack, including the thing that they just turned round and went home for, none of them have screens and none of them connect to the internet.

Catherine (Aged 11) – The person most likely to think that if everything was taken back out of the backpack, there might be enough room for her.

Nic - Map Reading at Botany Bay

Nic – Map Reading at Botany Bay

Nic’s Advice for Fellow Fathers (in no particular order):

1. Just do it. There is never a right time to start. Don’t think. Do. Get on with it or you will never start.

2. Ignore the remonstrations of your children. Once they actually get to the coast they have fun. Persuading them to go down there in the first place, however, is a weekly task. When they ask how far you are going to walk each weekend, think of a number and double it. Stick to the answer without any hint of humour.

3. Walkie-talkies – these were an idea of a friend of mine and they are worth their weight in gold. They give the kids a new lease of life after 10 miles or so. You occasionally pick up other random conversations between persons unknown and get to interject with complete anonymity. The kids absolutely love that. Especially when it’s the police.

4. Have a checklist of things you need to take with you. I never make a checklist and every week I regret it.

5. Buy a big backpack. Your wife will fill it. From skiing jackets in mid-summer to swimming trunks in the deep winter, it can all end up in there. It is best to just accept what is put in and get on with it.

6. Remember to take last week’s packed lunch remains out of your backpack when you get home at the end of the walk. Especially if they include banana skins.

Deb at Hythe Beach

Deb at Hythe Beach

 Deb’s Advice for Mindful Mothers

1. Put the cat out! We have to go back because I have left something in, not out!

2. Leave dry socks back at the car. Kids. Sea. Regardless of weather. Enough said.

3. Food. The night before. The morning of the walk. The mid morning of the walk. The lunchtime of the walk. The mid-afternoon snack of the walk. You get the idea. But no bananas – see husband’s rule no. 6 above.

4. We plan our route, view it on Google Earth, and if it looks being anything other than ‘get to the beach, turn right and keep walking’, we look at other bloggers who have done the walk and see what they did. And we still get lost. Just like they did.

5. Never pass a loo. You never know when you will see one again.

6. Ditto ice cream vans.

Catherine at Sandwich Bay

Catherine at Sandwich Bay

Catherine’s Advice for Dutiful Daughters

1. My first tip would be always help your mum make your sandwiches or she might leave something out (hopefully by accident – salad).

2. Always put your own clothes out because my mum has always put winter clothes out when it’s sunny.  I’m normally too hot or too cold which is not nice when you have to walk 15 miles then wait for a taxi.

3. I sometimes do a check list the night before because you can’t leave all your stuff with your parents to sort out and there is always something we need to go back for.

4. Bring a camera for your own pictures because there might be something you want to take a picture of but your dad doesn’t.

5. I prefer sports socks than walking socks because the walking socks are just too itchy to wear for a whole day.

Ben "doing what he does best!"

Ben “doing what he does best!”

Ben’s Advice for Surly Sons

1. Get woken up by mum when I’m really tired.

2. Drink and eat anything I get cuz I get really hungry.

3. Try not to throw up in the car (listening to Capital FM works well for me).

4. If I can’t listen to Capital then I bring my MP3 player.

5. Stuff myself at breakfast cuz I get hungry.

Hope Gap (Seven Sisters cliffs in the background)

The Maunder Taylor Family at Hope Gap (Seven Sisters cliffs in the background)

~~ There you have it! Big backpack; big breakfast; go! Good luck – only 7,000 miles to cover! ~~

My sincerest thanks to Nic, Deb, Ben, and Catherine for sharing their time, tips, photos, and fun with us! You too can join them on their excellent adventure at The Coastal Path: One family’s walk around the coast of Britain. ~Jody

Happy wayfaring!

Posted in Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland, Featured Guest Writer, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , , , | 8 Comments »

“Where can I find sea glass?”

Posted by Jody on April 16, 2014

Here are a few handy tips for our sea glass treasure hunters!

Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches

Collecting sea glass is such a fun hobby. Many an eager beachcomber has headed to the seashore in hopes of discovering the ideal piece of sea glass (also called beach glass). Finding that perfectly frosted, wave tumbled jewel can make the very best day at the beach even better!

Often times people will ask, “Where can I find sea glass on _(fill in the blank)_?” My answer goes something like this: “That’s a great question. In my experience, the best beaches for finding sea glass are near the more populated locales, especially around areas with bars. Party scene locations tend to produce more glass in the surrounding water. Check for low tides, too. You will most likely find more sea glass when the tide is out and the beach is lengthened. Have a wonderful time! Let us know what you find! ~Aloha”

Sea Glass, Surfside, Texas (©Jody Diehl)

A…

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Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Sand and Shoreline, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , | 9 Comments »

Explore These Amazing Beaches

Posted by Jody on October 28, 2013

Today’s Featured Guest Writer is Andrea.

Explore These Amazing Beaches

 Ayia Napa, Cyprus (Photo by Paul167 /Wikimedia)

Ayia Napa, Cyprus (Photo by Paul167 /Wikimedia)

Ayia Napa, Cyprus

This resort city on Cyprus’ shore has a unique vibe to it, which has earned its reputation as the perfect place to have parties that start in the afternoon and last all night long, everyday thanks to this Mediterranean island’s warm climate. Ayia Napa is home to the largest water park in Europe: Water World.

The medieval monasteries on the coastline overlooking the blue waters of the Mediterranean are open for visitors every day, making Ayia Napa’s beach an interactive and family-friendly destination. Organized cruises take tourists to sea, where they can dive the blue waters of the Mediterranean and explore the colorful marine life.

Negril, Jamaica (Photo by Alphakaya/Wikimedia)

Negril, Jamaica (Photo by Alphakaya/Wikimedia)

Negril Beach, Jamaica

Have you ever wondered what the perfect sunset looks like? Then you should come to Negril Beach on the Caribbean island of Jamaica and see for yourself. The sunset at Negril Beach is considered one of the loveliest on the planet and attracts numerous honeymooners and couples on the Jamaican beach of Negril.

Seven Mile Beach is the largest beach in Negril and, just as its name implies, is a seven miles stretch of sand.

Poipu Beach Park, Kauai, Hawaii (Photo by  Polihale/Wikipedia)

Poipu Beach Park, Kauai, Hawaii (Photo by Polihale/Wikipedia)

Poipu Beach, Kauai, Hawaii

A small corner of paradise on the island of Kauai in Hawaii, the golden sand beaches enclosed by tall palm trees await tourists on the sunbathed Poipu Beach with numerous attractions. The secluded beaches and romantic promenades make Poipu Beach one of the premier honeymoon destinations in the Hawaiian Islands.

The island of Kauai offers numerous outdoor activities, from water sports to mountaineering. Tourists can try mountain biking or hiking up the neighboring mountains. Water sports enthusiasts can kayak, surf, scuba dive, or fish.

Adventure Bay Beach, Tasmania

If you are in search for a less crowded beach, then the Tasmanian shores are the answer. Adventure Beach is one of those places in the world that have not yet been invaded by large resorts and luxurious hotels, where life still unwinds at a slow pace. The long sandy beach is the perfect place to sunbathe, swim in warm and friendly waters, and relax in a hammock under the palm trees. The neighboring mountains are just waiting to be explored by nature lovers. Many nearby hotels are eco-friendly.

 Punta Cana, Dominican Republic (Photo by  Inmouchar/Wikimedia)

Punta Cana, Dominican Republic (Photo by Inmouchar/Wikimedia)

Punta Cana Beach, Dominican Republic

Caribbean postcards usually have one thing in common: Punta Cana Beach. It is the ultimate picture-perfect retreat, with crystal-clear waters and coconut trees swaying in the wind, all in the vicinity of a rich tropical forest. Located on the eastern coast of the Dominican Republic, Punta Cana means “Point of the White Cane Palms” and was named after the cane palms which grow in the area. Here, 40 kilometers of beaches overlook both the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. Punta Cana Beach is home to numerous all-inclusive resorts.

Opening up to the Caribbean Sea, Playa Blanca is the most popular resort on Punta Cana Beach. Playa Blanca means “white beach” and owes its name to its white sands.

About the Author: Andrea is a Blogger and Write from UK. She loves to write articles on various categories like Finance, Technology, Travel and Health. As of now she is doing a research work on ukba.

~~~

Posted in Featured Guest Writer, Monday Miscellaneous, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Safe, Fun, and Successful Beach Metal Detecting!

Posted by Jody on October 8, 2013

Today’s Featured Guest Writer is Daniel Bernzweig.

Packing List for a Safe, Fun, and Successful Beach Metal Detecting Trip

So you have decided to take a trip to the beach? Whether your next metal detecting trip takes you near or far from home, there are some supplies you simply won’t want to be caught without when beach treasure hunting. I’ve been metal detecting since I was a boy and, as a result, I know a lot about what you’ll need to have on hand to be prepared for anything, as well as what happens when you head out unprepared! Here is a comprehensive packing list that will make any metal detecting beach adventure, fun, safe, and successful.

Metal Detecting on the Beach in Santa Cruz, California

Metal Detecting on the Beach in Santa Cruz, California

First off, of course, is your metal detector. You can’t go metal detecting at the beach without one! But be sure your machine is made to handle the conditions you’ll encounter (e.g. waterproof, right size search coil, ground balance controls, etc.). Otherwise, revise your plans, or you may end up making a costly mistake. The beach is actually one of the first spots that most people envision when they think of metal detecting. And in reality, it is a great place to begin as it is restocked with targets on a daily basis.

You’ll also want to have some quality metal detecting tools along while searching for treasure at the beach. A pinpointer and a digging tool are standard, and many detectorists also take along a metal detecting sifter or shovel. Other metal detecting accessories you may want to have with you include headphones, extra batteries, and/or additional search coils.

A protective treasure case is another essential you’ll always want to have on your metal detecting trips. Any non trash target you unearth should be put into your case and cleaned when you get home, not on the field. In many instances, like with coins for example, rubbing off the dirt will scratch the item. It’s better to take everything home for proper cleaning and inspection; even though the wait can be a bit difficult, to say the least!

It looks like he found something!

Score!

Sunscreen and protective clothing should always be worn when out metal detecting. With an engrossing hobby like this we often forget just how long we’ve been working under the hot sun, and the end result of that is a nasty sunburn; unless you’re properly dressed and sun screened, of course.

Always take enough water with you, plus some extra in case you’re out longer than expected. The same goes for food.

Having a few first aid supplies on hand while out metal detecting has come in handy more times than I can count. A few bandaids, some antibacterial ointment, some first aid tape and gauze pads (additional items if you have more space) are easy to put into a plastic bag and take up very little weight and room in your pack.

Bringing a GPS along with you when you’re out metal detecting is probably one of the only precaution I might describe as optional. That said, having one can be a priceless safety net in certain situations.

If your metal detecting trip will take you in and around water, here are a few more things to add to your packing list. If you plan on doing any shallow water metal detecting a wetsuit or waders may be warranted. Additional equipment is obviously required if you plan on metal detecting while snorkeling scuba diving. When metal detecting in and around water you’ll also need a few special metal detecting accessories, including a sand scoop, a waterproof search coil and a waterproof backpack or other container for your treasures. As long as you have these important items along, your metal detecting trip is sure to be safe, a lot of fun, and most likely more successful, too.

Daniel Bernzweig

Daniel Bernzweig

About the author: Daniel Bernzweig manages MetalDetector.com in Southborough, MA. He has written on the subject of treasure hunting and metal detecting since the mid 1980’s. He enjoys traveling with his metal detector and helping to educate others in the correct use of metal detectors in their explorations.  You can check out his article “What are the best Metal Detectors for Metal Detecting at the Beach” for some great tips on equipment selection.

~~~

A note from our treasure hunters:

We simply love to share when it comes to beaches, treasure hunting, beachcombing crafts, and beachy tips. How about you? Do you have a favorite beach you’d like to share with us? Maybe you have some great tips for beach picnics, seaside safety, or seashore activities. Please check out our Submission Guidelines for info on jumping into the fun at Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches.  You may be our next Featured Guest Writer!

Posted in Beach Safety Tips, Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Featured Guest Writer, Sand and Shoreline, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , , , | 11 Comments »

5 Creative Ways for Getting Sand Off Your Feet After the Beach

Posted by Jody on September 4, 2013

Today’s Featured Guest Writer is Emma Roberts.

Going to the beach is awesome; getting sand in your house and car, not so much. It’s funny how a great afternoon playing in the sand and running in the waves can be dampened when you realize how much of a mess you’ve made tracking all that sand back inside with you. It almost looks like you tried to bring the beach home. Fortunately, there are a few ways to prevent your car and house from looking like a hurricane hit them by getting the sand off your feet after you leave the beach. Some are inventive, some are obvious classics, but they’re all worth incorporating into your next beach day.

Just add water for instant sandy feet!

Instant Sandy Feet: Just Add Water!

Baby powder

Seriously. Toss a bottle of baby powder into your beach bag and get ready to have your life changed. When you leave the beach, apply a nice heap of powder to your feet and rub it in. This absorbs the moisture that’s causing the sand to stick to your feet, and you’ll be able to brush off the excess and walk away. Plus, now your feet smell nice and clean.

Portable water supply

One of the best ways to wash sand off your feet is to use, well, water. A lot of beaches have shower-type stalls where the sand meets the parking lot and you can spray down your legs and feet and knock off the worst of the dirt. Sometimes, though, that’s not enough. (And sometimes you’ll still have to cross some sand to get to your car, in which case, you’re back to square one.) The solution? Pack a small plastic tub and a big bottle of water before you go, then use them when you’re standing next to your car. It doesn’t take much; just enough for you to submerge your feet and rinse them down. Then you can towel off, dump the water and be on your way.

Welcome mats

This one’s so obvious that most people overlook it. Take a welcome mat with you — or buy one for the occasion that you can leave in the car — and set it down next to your vehicle before you get in. Use a towel to knock off the bigger chunks, then wipe your feet on the welcome mat to clear out the rest of the sand.

Sandy Feet at Carmel by the Sea

Sandy Feet at Carmel by the Sea

Dry sand

Dry sand can actually adhere to the wetter sand on your feet and help to remove it. It’s a little like how lint sticks to itself, so a ball of lint can help you clean the lint trap in your dryer. When you’re ready to leave, scoop up some dry sand and rub it along your feet and legs, making sure to rub it into the wet sand that’s stuck to you. The dry sand can help slough off the wet stuff, making it easier to just dust off your feet with a towel before you go.

Specialty products

Staying sand-free is such a problem that there are a growing number of specialty products available to help you clean up after a day at the beach. For example, Sand-Off uses a special mitt that comes with a powder built right in, so all you have to do is apply the mitt to the sandy part of your body, let the powder squeeze out and wipe away the sticky sand. It’s good for multiple uses, and it’s a small enough product that you can toss it in your beach bag and forget about it until you need it.

Keeping excess sand out of your car and house can feel like an endless battle during beach season, and there’s always the chance that you or your kids will track some home no matter what you do. However, with the right preparation, you can go home clean and happy and leave the beach behind.

About the Author: Emma Roberts, a frequent contributor for SummerNanny.com. Read her contributed article 20 Blogs With Crafty Ways of Using Beach Sand. She can be contacted at her email: robertse055@gmail.com.

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