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Posts Tagged ‘beach safety sign’

Beach Rules

Posted by Jody on June 1, 2016

Posted in Beach Safety Tips, Tallies & Tips, Today's Special | Tagged: , , , | 4 Comments »

Weekly Photo Challenge: Escape “The Grip of the Rip”

Posted by Jody on May 21, 2013

Rip Currents – Break the Grip of the Rip!

Rip Current Safety

Rip Current Safety Sign Posted on Lifeguard Tower

     If Caught in a Rip Current

  • Don’t fight the current

  • Swim out of the current, then to shore

  • If you can’t escape, float or tread water

  • If you need help, call or wave for assistance

~~~

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), rip currents are the #1 safety threat at beaches.

Rip currents can be really hard to spot, so exercise caution if you see the following:

  1. a channel of churning, choppy water;
  2. an area with a noticeable difference in color;
  3. a line of foam, seaweed, or debris moving steadily out to sea;
  4. and/or a break in the incoming wave pattern.

If you get caught in one:

  1. Stay calm, don’t fight the current.
  2. Swim sideways out of the current and parellel to the shore, then at an angle back to the shore.

If you can’t escape it:

  1. Float or calmly tread water. The rip current will eventually fade.
  2. Try to face the shore, wave your arms, and yell for help.

If you see someone caught in one, DO NOT try to rescue them yourself, instead:

  1. Get a lifeguard or call 911.
  2. Yell instructions.
  3. And if possible, throw a life preserver or floatation device.

These things may help you save a life.

The ocean can be a source of fun and excitement, but you should always be careful of hazards that exist. Only swim at lifeguard protected beaches. Before your next trip to the beach, know how to spot a rip current and how to break the grip of the rip.

Source: Ocean Today (NOAA)

Lifeguard Tower Posted with Safety Signs

Lifeguard Tower with Posted Rip Current Safety Signs

Please take a look at these very helpful links:

“Don’t get sucked in by the rip…” Rip Current Science and Safety Video: Australia

The Grip of the Rip – NOAA Video

United States Lifesaving Association Rip Current Survival Guide

How Rip Currents Form

Have a safe day at the beach!

This week’s WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge topic is Escape.

~~~

Posted in Beach Safety Tips, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , , , , | 6 Comments »

Serenity, Sand and (yes) Sharks of Stinson Beach, Northern California

Posted by Jody on September 25, 2012

Stinson Beach, Northern California

I’ve seen Stinson Beach, California on many a “Best Shelling Beaches” list. Truth be told, though, I’ve never found a take-home seashell or sand dollar on this beautiful stretch of Northern California coastline.  No kidding!

Peaceful Stinson Beach on a gorgeous winter’s day.

Greg and I don’t go to Stinson Beach for its renowned (rumored?) beachcombing. We love heading to this beautiful beach for the quiet serenity of a long winter’s walk on a seemingly endless shoreline. I’m not sure if we’ve ever even been to Stinson Beach during the summer months, and that’s OK. Although there are lifeguard towers evident on the beach, with an average summer water temperature of 58°F, year-round rip current warnings and a shark attack history, we never plan to do much more than get some sand between our toes!

Left side of Stinson Beach safety sign

Right side of Stinson Beach safety sign

Even though this very thorough warning sign is posted prominently at the entrance to the beach, the Golden Gate National Recreation Site page states: “Swimming is only recommended from late May to mid-September when lifeguards are on duty.” All righty then…

The following Q & A comes from a wonderful White Shark Information webpage supported by the California Department of Fish and Game. In it you can find answers to many questions about white sharks (aka: great white sharks, or if you’re a surfer: the men in the grey suits).  The site covers everything from what white sharks typically eat to how to tell white sharks from other species of sharks and their role in the marine ecosystem. It’s definitely worth a look!

Q: How can people avoid white shark attacks?

There is only one foolproof method for avoiding a white shark attack: stay out of the ocean. If this is not an option, try to avoid places known for white sharks, such as the Farallon Islands, Ao Nuevo, and Bird Rock near Point Reyes. Another suggestion is to avoid swimming in areas where marine mammals are congregating. Don’t swim in or near areas frequented by sea lions, harbor seals, and elephant seals, etc. or near their rookeries.

Wearing a wetsuit and fins, or lying on a surfboard, creates the silhouette of a seal from below. Shark attacks are often believed to be cases of mistaken identity, with surfing or swimming humans mistaken for seals or sea lions. Times of reduced sunlight, such as foggy mornings or dusk, are ideal times to be mistaken for a seal.

View of Stinson Beach, California from the Pacific Coast Highway

Stinson Beach is located about 20 twisty miles north of San Francisco. Open every day of the year, Stinson Beach has rest rooms and shower facilities, picnic areas, and BBQ grills. Whale-watching is big here January through March. A snack bar is open during summer months and kayak and boogie board rentals are also available then. Keep in mind that Fido is not allowed on the beach area maintained by the National Park Service, but is welcome (on leash) in the parking lot area, picnic grounds and on the county section of the beach known as Upton’s Beach.

“I am a nice shark, not a mindless eating machine. If I am to change this image, I must first change myself. Fish are friends, not food.” ~Bruce (Great White Shark),  Finding Nemo

Posted in Beach Safety Tips, Northern California Beaches, Sharks, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , , , | 12 Comments »

Signs that make you go “Hmmm…”

Posted by Jody on July 2, 2012

Greg and I came across this sign near the Kehoe Beach trailhead at Point Reyes National Seashore in Northern California.

It made us go “Hmmm… How ’bout we just stick to the sand today!”

And so we did.

Posted in Monday Miscellaneous, Northern California Beaches, Today's Special | Tagged: , , , , , | 5 Comments »

Signs that make you go “Yikes!”

Posted by Jody on June 25, 2012

If you’ve been to Oahu some time after 1990, you probably have this shot in your vacation collection! This photo has probably been taken a million times by tourists over the years. I, of course, am no exception. In fact, I take a few shots of this very image every time I’m on Waikiki Beach!

Duke Paoa Kahanamoku, Waikiki Beach

Born and raised in Waikiki, Duke Paoa Kahanamoku was an Olympic champion swimmer, master surfer and expert outrigger canoe paddler. Known as the Father of Modern Surfing, a bronze statue of Duke welcomes locals and tourists to Waikiki Beach with open arms.

If you can’t make it to the beach, you can still see what’s happening around this statue! The City of Honolulu has a 24/7 webcam so you can check up on the conditions and live vicariously though the happy beach-goers. If you are on the beach already, smile, wave (maybe do a little dance), and show your friends how you are living it up in Hawaii. People from around the world can watch you, with musical accompaniment, near the Duke Kahanamoku statue and on the sands of Waikiki. This would be a very bad place to lose your suit to the surf!

Now, take another look at the picture above, right beside Duke’s left knee. Do you see it? There is a beach warning sign that really surprised me because there were so many people playing in the ocean on this day.

Yikes!

Even though there were plenty of swimmers and surfers nearby, it certainly was enough to keep me out of the water. That’s OK, though. It was the absolute perfect day for beachcombing. It always is!

Go ahead and take a look. Sit back, relax, and start the week off on the soft, warm sands of Waikiki Beach.

Aloha!

Posted in Beaches of The Hawaiian Islands, Monday Miscellaneous, Surfing Beach | Tagged: , , , , , , | 9 Comments »

 
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