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Posts Tagged ‘collecting beach stones’

Simply Decorate with Beach Treasures

Posted by Jody on July 19, 2014

You may have enjoyed many trips to the sandy shoreline without bringing home any treasured seashells.  Me too!  Sometimes there just aren’t any seashells to be found. Other times the seashells that are sparsely scattered about the beach are only broken bits of their former glory.

No seashells? No problem!  Just bring home the real estate! We have found some beautiful beaches made up of tiny black pebbles (Yachats, Oregon comes to mind). Other beaches, especially along Northern California’s coast, are streaked with rivers of colorful, tumbled stones and agates. These lovely beach treasures can be turned into a striking display when you get them back home.

Colorful Northern California Beach Stones on Display

Tiny fragments of seashells or coral can easily be substituted for these multicolored beach treasures. With or without a candle, this is a beautiful, memory-filled decoration. As you can see below, we have our candle dish of wave polished stones displayed right next to a pitcher full of sea tumbled glass, ceramic, and seashells we found at Fort Bragg, California many, many moons ago.

Sea Glass and Beach Stones. A Lovely Combination.

There’s something very zen about running your fingers through a bowl full of tiny, smooth beach gems. Beautiful colors and shapes just keep rising to the top. Try it. You’ll like it! 😉

How do you decorate with beach treasures?  We’d love for you to share your ideas and photos with us. Please join in and send your photos and descriptions to oneshellofafind@gmail.com, and we’ll happily show them off for you!

~~~

*You can also join us on Facebook at One Shell of a Find.*

 Published 2/23/12

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Posted in Beach Treasure and Seashell Crafts, Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Decorating With Beach Treasures | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Simply Decorate with Beach Treasures

Posted by Jody on February 23, 2012

You may have been to many beaches without bringing home any treasured seashells.  Me too!  Sometimes there just aren’t any seashells to be found. Other times the seashells that are sparsely scattered about the beach are only broken bits of their former glory.

No seashells? No problem!  Just bring home the real estate! We have found some beautiful beaches made up of tiny black pebbles (Yachats, Oregon comes to mind). Other beaches, especially along Northern California’s coast, are streaked with rivers of colorful, tumbled stones and agates. These lovely beach treasures can become a striking display when you get them back home.

Simply Decorate With Beach Treasures! Northern California Beach Stones on Display

Tiny fragments of seashells or coral can easily be substituted for these multicolored beach treasures. With or without a candle, this is a beautiful, memory-filled decoration. As you can see below, we have our candle dish of wave polished stones displayed right next to a pitcher full of sea tumbled glass, ceramic, and seashells we found at Fort Bragg, California many, many moons ago.

Sea Glass and Beach Stones. A Lovely Combination.

There’s something very zen about running your fingers through a bowl full of tiny, smooth beach gems.  Beautiful colors and shapes just keep rising to the top. Try it. You’ll like it! 😉

How do you decorate with beach treasures?  We’d love for you to share your ideas and photos with us. You can send your photos to oneshellofafind@gmail.com, and we’ll happily show them off for you!

*You can find us on Facebook at One Shell of a Find.*

~~~

Posted in Beach Treasure and Seashell Crafts, Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Decorating With Beach Treasures | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

South Arizona Telephone Cove, Lake Mohave, Arizona (Lake Mead National Recreation Area)

Posted by Jody on December 2, 2011

Shhhhhhh. We have a really great secret that we are going to share with you.  The Lake Mead National Recreation Area doesn’t tell you on their website or in their general park information that there is an awesome swimming beach near the Katherine Landing entrance station. The National Recreation Area’s park newspaper only lists Boulder Beach on Lake Mead (northwest of Hoover Dam) and Cottonwood Cove on Lake Mohave (east of Searchlight, Nevada) as designated swimming beach areas.  But, have we got a super Friday Find for you!

We stumbled upon an awesome surprise beach while on a roundabout drive home to Albuquerque from Las Vegas, Nevada. Heading into the Lake Mead National Recreation Area (NRA) at the Katherine Landing entrance station in Arizona, we had no idea what we’d find.  Passing by the Arizona Telephone Cove sign, we started our “explore” at Princess Cove, the farthest mapped point of interest from the park entrance.  Doubling back to Cabinsite Point and then on to North Arizona Telephone Cove we certainly found the many boat launches and plenty of scenic, shaded picnic areas set aside for park visitors. There was something that caught our eye, though. In the distance, the vague outline of a white, sandy-looking crescent was visible from our North Telephone Cove vantage point.  What exactly were we seeing, we wondered?

South Telephone Cove, Lake Mead NRA, Arizona (©Jody Diehl)

When we reached South Arizona Telephone Cove we couldn’t believe our good fortune! We found ourselves at the end of a dirt road, approaching a paved parking lot. We had found an absolutely gorgeous beach in a truly beautiful setting, complete with a roped off swimming area. “South Telephone Cove” has plenty of sandy shoreline, clear placid water, amazing Arizona desert views, and solitude.

View from the Beach, South Telephone Cove, Lake Mead NRA, Arizona (©Jody Diehl)

The sand along South Telephone Cove‘s shoreline ranges from sugar white (closer to the dunes) to pebbly areas perfect for beach rockhounding.  *You will want to wear your beach trekkers to protect your feet from the sharper pieces of rock.* It will be hard to decide whether to look down for the beautifully colored stones,  look up at the gorgeous scenery, or just look across the serene water for boats crossing beyond the cove.

What will you find beach rockhounding at South Telephone Cove, Arizona? (©Jody Diehl)

This area comes complete with shaded picnic tables and restrooms.  No lifeguards are on duty here, so be sure to follow the posted safety advice.

We cannot wait to head back to South Arizona Telephone Cove on a warm, sunny day! Even on a cool, overcast afternoon we had an absolutely splendid time at the beach.

This Way to the Beach!

Take the scenic route and enjoy the ride!

Posted in Beaches of North America, Friday Finds, Inland Shores | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments »

Beachcombing for Petoskey Stones! (Michigan)

Posted by Jody on October 6, 2011

Michigan has an Official State Stone. The Petoskey Stone! Who knew?  The name of the stone comes from an Ottawa Indian Chief, Chief Petosegay (or perhaps: Bedosegay). “The translation of the name is “rising sun,” “rays of dawn,” or “sunbeams of promise”.

Petoskey Stones can be found while beachcombing in the far northern area of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan (Think tippy-top of the mitten)!  The Petoskey Stone is found lining the beaches and amongst the sand dunes in the area around the city of Petoskey, Michigan.  The Michigan State Stone is plentiful on the beautiful, sandy shores of Petoskey State Park. The park’s mile-long sandy beach on Little Traverse Bay is also famous for it’s gorgeous sunsets!

Little Traverse Bay, Petoskey, Michigan (Photo by Bkonrad/Wikimedia Commons)

The Petoskey Stone is both a rock and a fossil. According to the MI DEQ GSD*: “The most often asked question is, “What is a Petoskey Stone?” A Petoskey is a fossil colonial coral. These corals lived in warm shallow seas that covered Michigan during Devonian time, some 350 million years ago.”

Polished Petoskey Stone (Photo credit: Jtmichcock/Wikimedia Commons)

For the science-minded among us: “This specific fossil coral is found only in the rock strata known as the Alpena Limestone. The Alpena Limestone is part of the Traverse Group of Devonian age. The Alpena Limestone is a mixture of limestones and shales. The outcrops of these rocks are restricted to the Little Traverse Bay area near Petoskey.”

The MI DEQ GSD has a wonderful 4-page write-up on the history, lore and facts about the Petroskey Stone.  They even have a very easy to follow, step by step tutorial on hand-polishing these beach treasures!

*All quotes are from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Geological Survey Division.

A lake is the landscape’s most beautiful and expressive feature.  It is earth’s eye; looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature.  ~Henry David Thoreau

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Great Lakes Beaches | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

A True Beach Treasure: The Lake Superior Agate

Posted by Jody on September 22, 2011

Lake Superior Agate, cut and polished – Minnesota (Photo by Astynax/Wikipedia Commons)

Minnesota’s State Gem is the Lake Superior agate.  These beautiful red, orange, yellow, white and grey gemstones are generously spread throughout northeastern and north-central Minnesota.  According to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources:“The agate reflects many aspects of Minnesota. It was formed during lava eruptions that occurred in our state about a billion years ago. The stone’s predominant red color comes from iron, the major industrial mineral in our state. Finally, the widely distributed agate reveals the impact of glacial movement across Minnesota a mere 10,000 to 15,000 years ago.”  The Lake Superior agate can be found in virtually any exposed gravel or pebbly area throughout the state.  Minnesota’s rocky North Shore beaches of Lake Superior are especially good hunting grounds for agate hounds.

Polished Lake Superior Agate – Minnesota (Photo by Diana Stein/Wikimedia Commons)

What a perfect beachcombing find! It’s a lake shore discovery you can display, or with some polishing, wear as unique jewelry.  These richly colored Lake Superior agates can be found on the shoreline as far north as Lake Superior’s Thunder Bay in Ontario, Canada.  They can also be found on the pebbly South Shore beaches of extreme northwestern Wisconsin and on the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

It can be a  bit tricky to spot the Lake Superior agates in their natural setting. The State of Minnesota’s Department of Natural Resources offers many tips and clues for finding and identifying the official state gem. “Agate Hounds”, a very good full-color brochure on the joys of Lake Superior agate hunting, is available for “young naturalists,” though it has helpful  information for agate hounds of all ages.  Be sure to check it out on the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources website.

Additionally, Digging into Minnesota Minerals  includes sections on  the geologic history of the Lake Superior agate, distribution and clues to finding the state gemstone.

Happy beachcombing!  Have a gem of a day! -J-

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Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Great Lakes Beaches | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

We Collect Just for the Fun of It!

Posted by Jody on August 21, 2011

I don’t imagine anyone needs to explain to us why we collect seashells, beach glass, beach stones and shark teeth.  It’s just plain fun for so many reasons.  I like to collect smaller beach treasures and put them into salt shakers and glass jars.  Looking at them year round makes me smile. The memories of the seashore with friends and family are really happy ones.  That’s enough to keep me collecting.  How ’bout you?

Beach Treasures: 1) Sanibel Island, Florida 2) Oahu, Hawaii 3) Pebbly Beach, Catalina Island, California (©Jody Diehl)

Here are a few recent articles on the sheer joy of collecting!

“Collection Reflection: Why do we amass these things?”

“Sea Glass Summers”

“A knack for finding a message in a bottle”

Check out some of our collectable and beachcombing articles.

“Pick Your Own” Prehistoric Shark Teeth!”

“Colors of Sunset: Gould’s Wedge Seashells”

“Brighton, A Top 10 British Memory”

“Sea Stone Collecting Hobby Leads to a Wonderfully Creative Alphabet Book”

Tell us about your collection!  And don’t forget to share us on Facebook.  Thanks! -J-

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Seashells | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Brighton, A Top 10 British Memory

Posted by Jody on July 29, 2011

Brighton (East Sussex, England), the closest south coast resort to London, became fashionable in the mid 18th century as sea bathing came into vogue.  Brighton beach may not be named one of the Top 10 British Beaches *by VisitBritain.com but it certainly makes our list of Top 10 British Memories!

“Boats on Brighton Beach”, by Simon Carey, geograph.org.uk

Several years ago our youngest daughter was studying at The Flute Studio of Trevor Wye, in Hastingleigh, Kent.  I was fortunate enough to fly over during her January break so the two of us could enjoy a beach vacation together. We drove along the coast from Folkstone to Brighton enjoying the beautiful coastline of southeast England.  All along the way we splashed and beach combed.  We were awed by the beauty of  Beachy Head, the spectacular chalk cliff on the outskirts of Eastbourne and we hiked along the cliff top until the rains came.  It was an amazing journey that ended just as happily at Brighton, England’s first seaside resort.

Brighton Beach Treasure (Photo by Jody Dieh)

Brighton has a long stretch of pebbly beach that’s perfect for beach treasure hunting. In fact, according to the official tourism guide to Brighton, VisitBrighton.com , “There are around 614 billion pebbles on Brighton beach.” –Minus one.- This one’s mine!

Another daughter, E.G.D., informs me that in folklore, if a person finds a rock with a hole in it, that rock is not only lucky, but magical.  Apparently, one can see things through the hole that would not be easily seen otherwise (perhaps she could see through a fairy glamour, or perhaps she could see a hiding ghost!).  I checked mine, but the room looked just about the same as usual, only framed by a rock.  Oh, well!

Enjoy the journey!  -J-

*”Britain’s Top 10 Beaches” post 7/26/2011

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland, Friday Finds, Sand and Shoreline | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Beach Stone Collecting Hobby Leads to a Wonderfully Creative Alphabet Book

Posted by Greg on July 19, 2011

Post by Jody Diehl

This is really fun: Turning a beachcombing collection into an artful book!  I’ll never look at beach stones and rocks the same way! These are particular beach stones are real beach treasures, mostly from the “Treasure Coast” of Florida (roughly from Sebastian to Jupiter).

Beachcomber Leslie McGuirk has turned her beach stone collecting hobby into a work of art.  From letters to fish to toast…

Here’s a clip of the article by Peter Pringle of the TC Palm:  “The book— “If Rocks Could Sing: A Discovered Alphabet” — is a photographic collection of seashore-discovered rocks in the shape of each letter of the alphabet, and of rocks resembling objects that begin with the letter.”

I’m inspired to head to the beach, where I might find lions and tigers and bears… oh my.

A Very Pebbly Beach! - Rialto Beach, Olympic National Park, Washington (Photo by Wing-Chi Poon/Wikimedia Commons)

WooHooo! One more thing to look for at the seashore: animal shaped beach stones! Who knew?

Have a great day at the beach!

“If Rocks Could Sing – A Discovered Alphabet” by Leslie McGuirk

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Monday Miscellaneous | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

 
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