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Posts Tagged ‘collecting sea glass’

Wellington, NZ and the Storm Coast

Posted by E.G.D. on March 19, 2015

We made it to Wellington well before midnight. The commodore, (who has been captaining our ship since Sydney) wanted the ship to be safely tucked into Wellington’s harbor as early as possible.

It was a dark and rainy day. The morning started with an excursion to the aptly named Storm Coast. And was it ever a blast! We wound around the coast from Wellington to Eastbourne, viewing some really fantastic scenery and watching the Picton-Wellington ferry clash with the sea’s swells.  It was cold, wet, and sooooo windy (the kind of wind you have to lean into to hopefully stay on your feet). All in all, the perfect day for a visit to The Storm Coast, and travel into the section of the shoreline also known as The Shipwreck Coast.


The drive ended at a beautiful, hilltop sheep ranch where we were served tea (as in tea and treats). The ranch owner and his two faithful dogs gave us a sheep herding demonstration which was great fun. Then it was back to Wellington, along the same stretch of coast, as high tide approached the coastline. That, and the wind, made for fun photo stops at a shipwreck and a lighthouse beach along the return route.

After the tour, Greg and I headed into New Zealand’s capital city. We followed the seafront from the ship’s berth to Oriental Bay, about a three mile walk (The Maritime Heritage Trail). On the beach at Oriental Bay we found quite a bit of sea glass in brown, green, and clear colors. Along the way I was struck by the amount of public art Wellington has to offer. Every nook and cranny seemed to have some sort of purposefully designed public art to sit on, walk across, or simply ponder over.

No time for snooping around shops today. We had to make it back to the ship for our departure to Aukland. Now, even though Commodore Rynd has altered our course, this was the day with our roughest seas yet (but only for a short while)!

Have a wonderful yesterday! -Jody & Greg

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Posted in Beaches of Australia and New Zealand | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

“Where can I find sea glass?”

Posted by Jody on April 16, 2014

Here are a few handy tips for our sea glass treasure hunters!

Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches

Collecting sea glass is such a fun hobby. Many an eager beachcomber has headed to the seashore in hopes of discovering the ideal piece of sea glass (also called beach glass). Finding that perfectly frosted, wave tumbled jewel can make the very best day at the beach even better!

Often times people will ask, “Where can I find sea glass on _(fill in the blank)_?” My answer goes something like this: “That’s a great question. In my experience, the best beaches for finding sea glass are near the more populated locales, especially around areas with bars. Party scene locations tend to produce more glass in the surrounding water. Check for low tides, too. You will most likely find more sea glass when the tide is out and the beach is lengthened. Have a wonderful time! Let us know what you find! ~Aloha”

Sea Glass, Surfside, Texas (©Jody Diehl)

A…

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Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Sand and Shoreline, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , | 9 Comments »

Seaham sea glass

Posted by Jody on June 3, 2013

Alex is one of my very favorite artists! Not only is she a “textile art jack-of-all-trades,” she’s also one heck of a beachcomber. Take a look at her newest stash! ~Amazing!

~~~

Under A Topaz Sky

I’d heard about the beach at Seaham in County Durham being an amazing place for sea glass and after googling some pictures and drooling heavily, I persuaded the family to take a run up the A1 a few days ago, as it was half term, to make a visit.

There was a glass factory at Seaham from the middle of the 1800s to the early part of the twentieth century and with true Victorian disregard for the environment, at the end of the day, the glass waste was poured into the sea. The resulting glass, tumbled and frosted by the waves, comes up as little nuggets on the beach.

Seaham beach

I’m afraid I didn’t notice much of the actual beach or surroundings – as soon as we got there my head was down, searching, and marvelling over the way the shingle and sand is dotted with little globules of glass like bubbles, most…

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Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland | Tagged: , , , , | 23 Comments »

A Sea Glass Treasure Trove – Surfside Beach (Texas Gulf Coast)

Posted by Jody on February 7, 2013

Surfside Beach, Texas

Surfside Beach, Texas

The Village of Surfside Beach, Texas, is a little bitty seaside hamlet located on the Gulf of Mexico. Fishing, birding, picnicking and kayaking are just a few of the choices beachgoers have when they visit the shores of this little coastal community.

This stretch of sandy beach on the Texas Coastal Bend is already well known for its wonderful shelling. In fact, according to Surfside’s website, there are 600 known shell species that can be found along the  27 miles of Brazoria County’s beaches. Our family searched and searched for those hundreds of types of seashells and did find many a fine specimen, but, sadly, quite a few had been broken to bits by the trucks and cars that are allowed on so much of this section of  Texas’s coastal beaches.

Surfside Beach, Texas

Surfside Beach, Texas

Never fear, though! All is certainly not lost. (It never is on a day at the beach!) In my book, Surfside Beach is one of the absolute best strands that I’ve ever come across for collecting sea glass!

Beach Treasures from Surfside Beach, Texas Gulf Coast

Beach Treasures from Surfside Beach, Texas Gulf Coast

Greens and blues, pinks and browns, lettered and patterned and smooth; all types of glass in every stage of sea-tumbledness can be found on the sands of Surfside Beach. I won’t share how I think the wave-worn beach glass originates, but I will site rule #11 from the village’s Beach Rules web page, which states: “NO GLASS CONTAINERS ON THE BEACH” (all caps). *This is a great place to caution you to wear shoes on this stretch of shoreline.* The vehicle traffic that easily crushes those 600 species of seashells also breaks glass into pieces which can result in some very sharp edges. Discrimination is the key. It can be very hard for kids of all ages to resist picking every beautiful, glittering, colorful beach treasure they see, so little ones need to be closely supervised here!

Evening Picnic at Surfside Beach, Texas

Evening Picnic at Surfside Beach, Texas

Before or after you’ve filled up your buckets and bags with sea glass and shells, you may want visit Surfside Beach’s Jetty Park which runs along the Freeport Jetties.  It has picnic areas, restrooms, a playground and fantastic views of the gulf and ship channel. You can walk the jetty, fish from the rocks, or simply settle in and watch the huge container ships come and go through the jetty channel.

Surfside Beach is located in Brazoria County, 15 minutes southeast of Lake Jackson, Texas where TX-332 meets TX-257 (Bluewater Highway).

Have a great day at the beach!

~~~~

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Gulf of Mexico Beaches, Seashells | Tagged: , , , , , | 20 Comments »

Glass Beach: Where Trash Turns into Treasure

Posted by alainaflute on September 27, 2012

To scoop or not to scoop? That is the question. Whether ’tis nobler to leave finds upon the water-lapped shores…or to just pick them up and bring them home. Beachcombing regulations. They exist. Know before you go.

Today’s Glass Beach

Although it is always important to leave living creatures alone on the beach, we’re not positive all regulations about picking up beach debris are real or enforced. Glass? Remnants of a dumpsite? That’s a little trickier. We at Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches will always recommend that beach-goers follow the rules/regulations/laws of any given beach. On the other hand, it is hard to support hearsay. So, here’s some hearsay for you: You’re not supposed to pick up what you find on Glass Beach.

The “sand” of Glass Beach, Fort Bragg, California

Glass Beach (near Fort Bragg, California) has some lovely, man-made sand. It didn’t used to be quite so lovely. Residents used to shove their trash over the cliffs onto the beach below. In 1967, the North Coast Water Quality Board realized the error of this arrangement and plans were begun for a new dump site away from the ocean. Over the years, the waves tossed the trash into treasure: beach glass, namely. The beach is peppered with tiny pebbles, smoothed glass, polished china bits, and even the odd seashell. It’s rather tempting to scoop up a salt shaker amount of “sand.”

The old days at Glass Beach. (Note the rusted vehicle frame jutting out from the bluff.)

Glass Beach before the clean-up.

Glass Beach before the cleanup.

Much of what is known as Glass Beach is now part of MacKerricher State Park, and according to FortBragg.com, collecting is not allowed within the state park, but it is perfectly OK to collect outside of the state park boundaries.

Just a note:  The only regulation we could find against beachcombing that has been sited online is California Code of Regulations, Section 4308Archaeological Features, “No person shall remove, injure, disfigure, deface, or destroy any object of archaeological, or historical interest or value.” We found nothing on the official MacKerricher State Park website (or in the park brochure) that verifies this information. Are the pummeled fragments of glass on the beach an “object of archaeological or historical interest or value”?

Either way, Glass Beach is worth the visit!

You’ll find Glass Beach on California’s beautiful Mendocino Coast off of  Highway 1. In northern Fort Bragg, go west on Elm Street (at the Denny’s) to Old Haul Road. You’ll see an area for parking at the curve of West Elm and Old Haul. It’s a just short walk down a worn path to the beach.

*Tag team post by Alaina and Jody*

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Northern California Beaches | Tagged: , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Exploring Dead Horse Bay

Posted by Jody on September 14, 2012

Here’s to great beachcoming days! As our friend at Blue Dot Jewelry said: “I guess it takes a trash dump to find the real goods! :-)”

Many thanks to Blue Dot Jewelry for sharing an interesting day and some very surprising seashore finds with us.

Blue Dot Jewelry

For years I’ve only known of this area by its bleak name, and its history as the location of several horse rendering plants, and then as a late 19th-century trash dump. I had no interest in visiting.

However, the dump has begun to resurface, bringing glass, ceramics and other treasures to the tide’s edge. We learned this through an article that Arthur stumbled upon earlier this week. It inspired us to take a de-stressing day trip down to see what we might find.

The bay is simple to access, just to the west of Floyd Bennett Field, via the Q35 bus. We walked another half mile past the bus stop, along the road and then through a stretch of lush dunes, to find the beach. It’s unmistakable. I’ve never see a beach strewn with so much stuff.

Much of what is there is just trash, but more than anything there is glass, in…

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Posted in Atlantic Coast Beaches, Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Friday Finds | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Soap Solutions with Seaside Style

Posted by Jody on August 16, 2012

You know how hand soap can get a little squidgy when it sits in the the soap dish?  Here are a few ways to keep that bar of soap high and dry with seaside style.  Just place a handful of tumbled beach treasures between the soap and the dish to keep your bar from sitting in sudsy water. It’s the perfect everyday use for little one-of-a-kind finds! Not only that, these beach themed soap dishes add an extra fun touch of color to the bathroom or kitchen sink.

We found these wave polished pottery pieces at Pebbly Beach on beautiful Catalina Island, California.

Sea tumbled pottery

These smooth seashells fragments are just the right size  and color for the soap-dish-sized Giant Rock Scallop shell we found on the beach in Bolinas, California.

Smoothly polished bits of seashells in a Giant Rock Scallop

Giant Rock Scallop (Crassedoma giganteum)

Sea glass adds a colorful splash to any room.

Sea glass for your soap dish

For obvious reasons, your absolute smoothest beach treasures are the best ones for propping up your soap bar.  They’re also easier to rinse clean.

Beach treasures and clean hands never go out of style.  Also (and I really can’t help myself, here) beach treasure soap dishes are just good clean fun!

Posted in Decorating With Beach Treasures, Seashells | Tagged: , , , | 3 Comments »

Southwold Sea Glass and Pottery Shards

Posted by alainaflute on May 17, 2012

Thank you to underatopazsky for letting us share her post today! We really enjoyed reading about her beachcombing trip to Southwold, England.

Under A Topaz Sky

We spent the Bank Holiday with my parents in East Suffolk and one day we took the girls down the coast to the little town of Southwold to visit Southwold Pier. It’s gorgeous to visit –  fabulous places to eat, quirky things to see and buy and best of all, great beachcombing!

The soft East Anglian coast between Southwold and Lowestoft to the north is eroding rapidly and the debris of roads, houses etc that have fallen into the sea inevitably wash up further down the coast. My 14yr old picked up an interesting piece of what looked like conglomerate which actually turned out to be an unmistakeable lump of tarmac!

I’ve had some of my best sea glass finds from this beach, including a glass Victorian bottle stopper on New Year’s Day and even though our visit was cut short as  it was raining and bitterly cold, I still managed to…

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Posted in Amusement Piers, Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Beaches of Great Britain and Ireland | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

“Where can I find sea glass?”

Posted by Jody on May 1, 2012

Collecting sea glass is such a fun hobby. Many an eager beachcomber has headed to the seashore in hopes of discovering the ideal piece of sea glass (also called beach glass). Finding that perfectly frosted, wave tumbled jewel can make the very best day at the beach even better!

Often times people will ask, “Where can I find sea glass on _(fill in the blank)_?” My answer goes something like this:

“That’s a great question. In my experience, the best beaches for finding sea glass are near the more populated locales, especially around areas with bars. Party scene locations tend to produce more glass in the surrounding water. Check for low tides, too. You will most likely find more sea glass when the tide is out and the beach is lengthened. Have a wonderful time! Let us know what you find! ~Aloha”

Surfside Beach Treasures

Surfside Beach Treasures

A colorful assortment of surf tumbled sea glass is generally easier to find near beaches where the regulars hang out (as opposed to tourist packed strands). Why? I’m sorry to say, that’s where people often leave their empty bottles on the sand or toss them into the water. Let’s face it,  glass doesn’t naturally come from the sea, and you would be hard pressed to find a beach where glass containers aren’t prohibited.

We recently spent some time on the Texas Gulf Coast, southwest of Galveston. I have to admit that I have rarely seen such a selection of glass on the beach! Some of it was beautifully tumbled and worth bringing home, but so much of the glass looked newly broken by both tides and tires (cars are allowed on many of the Texas beaches which line the Gulf of Mexico). The adults in the group carefully picked up some of the sharper shards of glass and carried them to the nearby, oh-so-conveniently placed municipal trash cans (seriously, you couldn’t miss ’em). But we had to warn the children not to pick up any beach glass because they weren’t old enough to discriminate between the sharper edged pieces and the more aged, smoothly polished beach treasures.

©Jody Diehl

Keep your shoes on! (©Jody Diehl)

There may have been a day, long ago, when beachgoers didn’t “know any different.” But in today’s world, we really do know better.  We at Beach Treasures and Treasure Beaches are all for collecting sea glass!  It’s one of our favorite things to do at the shore. We do not, however, want to contribute to the sea glass treasure troves of future generations.  It’s true that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure, but with sea glass, it takes a while to get from point A to point B, and in the meantime, it can pose a serious hazard to those of us who want to be barefoot on the beach with our little ones.

Wishing you many happy sea glass hunting days at the beach!

Do you have a favorite sea glass collecting beach? We’d love to hear about it!

Related link: North American Sea Glass Association

Posted in Beach Safety Tips, Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Sand and Shoreline, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , , , | 9 Comments »

At the Beach in “Funky Town” – Bolinas, California

Posted by Jody on February 9, 2012

Bolinas, California (©Jody Diehl)

I have to admit, the moment Greg and I entered the little unincorporated community of Bolinas, California, the lyrics to the song “Funky Town” ran through my mind.  It kept playing and playing, all the way to the beach.  (There it is again!)

Won’t you take me to
Funkytown
Won’t you take me to
Funkytown
Won’t you take me to
Funkytown
Won’t you take me to
Funkytown ~ Lyrics by Steven Greenberg ~Thanks a lot! 😉

If you are in the area, then Bolinas Beach is a must-do stop in my book!  About 30 miles north of San Francisco, off of State Route 1, this beach is jam-packed with personality (personalities, rather)! You’ll see surfers galore, paddle boarders, splashers, and sunbathers.  The Bolinas townsfolk are as eclectic a bunch as you’ll ever see, and many of them are at the beach.  The day we were there, a disheveled man raced past us in the current, heading out to sea from the direction of Bolinas Lagoon. His vessel? Some sort of tiny, makeshift raft, complete with an umbrella set up as a mast. Shortly thereafter, he returned to the shore, soaking wet and on foot, still wearing his leather jacket. His hat was still securely tied onto his head with what appeared to be a white gym sock. We will never know what final destination he had in mind!

Do yourself a favor and set aside some time to watch the surfers at Bolinas Beach.  Better yet, take a surf lesson! The views here are amazing, and the beachcombing is fantastic! We found everything from Giant Rock Scallops and colorful sea glass to beautifully bored mudstone.

Bolinas Beach Treasures (©Jody Diehl)

By the way, be sure to have a good map or GPS.  Bolinas is not signed from State Route 1. The scuttlebutt is that the locals take those pesky things down.

~We took Olema-Bolinas Road and followed through to Wharf Road. Parking was limited at the end of the street.

Have a great day at the beach!

Won’t you take me to
Funkytown
Won’t you take me to

~~~

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Northern California Beaches, Seashells, Surfing Beach | Tagged: , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

 
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