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Posts Tagged ‘Haystack Rock Cannon Beach Oregon’

Weekend’s Rock!

Posted by Jody on December 30, 2012

Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach, Oregon

Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach, Oregon

Haystack Rock is located near Cannon Beach on the North coast of Oregon, Haystack Rock is a unique monolith that attracts wildlife and tourists alike. Towering 235 feet over the beach, the Rock is home to nesting seabirds in the summer and marine invertebrates all year long. It is one of the largest “sea stacks” on America’s Pacific coast.

The rocky reefs of Haystack Rock and the neighboring Needles have abundant and rich intertidal life. Tidepoolers are drawn to its wonders every day. As many as 200,000 people visit Haystack Rock every year, mostly during the summer months when the tidepools are teeming and the nesting seabirds, proudly showing off breeding plumage, are busy introducing little ones into the world. Haystack Rock is protected under Fish and Wildlife regulations as a Marine Garden and a seabird nesting refuge.

Source: City of Cannon Beach

Haystack Rock, Cannon Beach, Oregon

We stop for a leisurely barefoot stroll on Cannon Beach every time we visit Oregon’s wild and wonderful coast.  The wide, sandy shoreline somehow always seems uncrowded.  Cannon Beach’s beautiful, clean strand is  always worth the time.
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Be sure to bring your binoculars so you can spot the well-coiffed resident Tufted Puffins throughout the spring and summer months!

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Posted in Beach and Coastal Wildlife, Beach Birding, Pacific Coast Beaches, Tide Pools, Weekend's Rock | Tagged: , , , , | 9 Comments »

Tufted Puffins, Birds With “Do”s

Posted by Greg on April 4, 2012

Tufted Puffin. Photo by Jeff Foote (NOAA Photo Library)

Here’s a great bit of news for those who want to see puffins but can’t go to Newfoundland or Europe. They’re coming to Oregon! Cannon Beach no less! According to the Coast Explorer, “Each spring, colorful Tufted Puffins return to Cannon Beach’s Haystack Rock to lay eggs and raise their chicks, offering the Northwest’s most accessible location to see nesting puffins. Throughout the spring and summer months, the Haystack Rock Awareness Program is on the beach at Haystack Rock offering interpretive information about the rock and the habitat it provides for intertidal creatures and birds. The program offers spotting scopes focused on nesting Tufted Puffins to offer visitors a look at the colorful birds.” This is definitely going on my to-do list.

Misty Morning at Haystack Rock

The Seattle Audubon Society tells us, “Tufted Puffins can be found in many coastal habitats adjacent to the Washington coast and elsewhere in the northern Pacific, with the exception of estuaries. They breed in colonies on islands with steep, grassy slopes or on cliff tops.

Tufted Puffin (Photo:Mike Boylan/PD-USgov-NOAA) Nice "do"

Winter habitat is well offshore, in mid-ocean.They dive and swim underwater, using their wings to paddle and their feet to steer their way through schools of small fish, which they catch in their bills. They can be seen carrying fish crosswise in their bills (sometimes 12 or more), which they take back to their young.

Tufted Puffins (Fratercula cirrhata) are a Northern Pacific sea bird. They are found along the Pacific Rim from the islands of Japan to Central California. Their average height is 15.5 inches, and these puffins have a relatively short wingspan. They are a stocky bird and need a running start to take off. Flight is difficult for them, but their wings aid them in swimming. They carry fish for their young to the nest in their bills, but they eat their own meals while under water.

The Alaska SeaLife Center explains: “During the summer breeding season, adults have dark bodies and white faces. Their legs are orange and their large triangular shaped bill is red-orange, with a buff or olive green plate at the top. The Tufted Puffin is distinguished by the long, straw colored tufts that curve backward from their red-ringed eyes. In the winter, they shed that buffy bill sheath and plumes and their face becomes dusky.”

I haven’t been to Cannon Beach, Oregon, in a while. Now seems like a good time to go, and what a great excuse to get away to the beach!

Happy coastal bird watching!

Posted in Beach and Coastal Wildlife, Beach Birding, Pacific Coast Beaches | Tagged: , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Beach Lovers’ Paradise of the Pacific Northwest, Cannon Beach, Oregon

Posted by Jody on March 19, 2012

Looking South to Cannon Beach, Oregon

Even if you’ve never been to Cannon Beach, Oregon, I’d be mighty surprised if you haven’t at least seen a picture or two of its celebrated landmark Haystack Rock. Haystack Rock, towering 235 feet above the beach, together with the Needles (two tall rocks jutting straight out of the surf nearby), form every beach photographer’s dream shot. This famous monolith and its rocky companions showcase the rugged beauty of  northern Oregon’s Pacific coastline and add even more natural beauty to an already perfect strand.

Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach, Oregon

Tidepoolers and birdwatchers are drawn to Cannon Beach for the amazing variety this seashore offers. According to the City of Cannon Beach,  “The rocky reefs of Haystack Rock and the neighboring Needles have abundant and rich intertidal life. Tidepoolers are drawn to its wonders every day. As many as 200,000 people visit Haystack Rock every year, mostly during the summer months when the tidepools are teeming and the nesting seabirds, proudly showing off breeding plumage, are busy introducing little ones into the world.”

Even without Haystack Rock, the beach’s fine, golden sand would be enough of a draw for any beach lover. This is one beautiful stretch of sandy shoreline. Cannon Beach delights barefoot beachcombers, energetic dogs, and sand castle architects alike. In fact, Cannon Beach will host its 48th Annual Sand Castle Contest on June 9th, 2012!

Kristie and Liam beachcombing at Cannon Beach, Oregon ~ What will you find?

A beachcomber’s playground, agates, seashells, and driftwood can all be found on Cannon Beach.  The Cannon Beach Chamber of Commerce poetically states:  “Wave after wave, tide after tide, storm after storm, an oft playful but occasionally serious ocean continues its endlessly fascinating performance. Countless shells, semiprecious agates and twisted pieces of driftwood go through nature’s rock tumbling process in preparation for discovery.”

Tidepooling, beachcombing, birdwatching and castle building. Mist or shine, Cannon Beach is the beach lovers’ paradise of the Pacific Northwest.

* Remember: the Pacific Northwest Coast offers beautiful views but it can also surprise with dangerous conditions.  You’ll want to check out Oregon’s Coastal Quirks for beach safety tips and information.

Feel free to leave a comment & please share us with your friends. Don’t forget to Like us on Facebook at One Shell of a Find! Thanks ~ and have a great day at the beach!

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Posted in Monday Miscellaneous, Pacific Coast Beaches, Tide Pools | Tagged: , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

 
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