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Posts Tagged ‘NOAA’

Staying Safe During Hawaii’s “Two Seasons”

Posted by Jody on October 22, 2013

Aloha! This is some really wonderful information from one of my favorite sites.
Stay safe & have a great day at the beach! ~Jody

Pacific Island National Parks

(The following article courtesy National Weather Service Honolulu Office Website )

Hawaii’s Ocean Awareness Week: October 21st – 25th, 2013

Hawaii Governor Neil Abercrombie’s Proclamation for Ocean Awareness Week

Weather and surf are distinguished by two distinct seasons in Hawaii. The surf seasons generally follow the seasonal changes in the weather pattern across the North-Central Pacific Ocean. The dry season in Hawaii runs from May through September, while the wet season runs from October through April.

During the dry season, long period south swells are most common. These swells are generated by storm systems churning away in the southern hemisphere to the east of Australia and New Zealand. Two distinct zones of storm generation are favorable for south swell development. The most favorable location is in the area just east of New Zealand, while a second less consistent area is located between Australia and New Zealand. The south swells travel nearly…

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Posted in Beach Safety Tips, Beaches of The Hawaiian Islands | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Weekly Photo Challenge: Escape “The Grip of the Rip”

Posted by Jody on May 21, 2013

Rip Currents – Break the Grip of the Rip!

Rip Current Safety

Rip Current Safety Sign Posted on Lifeguard Tower

     If Caught in a Rip Current

  • Don’t fight the current

  • Swim out of the current, then to shore

  • If you can’t escape, float or tread water

  • If you need help, call or wave for assistance

~~~

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), rip currents are the #1 safety threat at beaches.

Rip currents can be really hard to spot, so exercise caution if you see the following:

  1. a channel of churning, choppy water;
  2. an area with a noticeable difference in color;
  3. a line of foam, seaweed, or debris moving steadily out to sea;
  4. and/or a break in the incoming wave pattern.

If you get caught in one:

  1. Stay calm, don’t fight the current.
  2. Swim sideways out of the current and parellel to the shore, then at an angle back to the shore.

If you can’t escape it:

  1. Float or calmly tread water. The rip current will eventually fade.
  2. Try to face the shore, wave your arms, and yell for help.

If you see someone caught in one, DO NOT try to rescue them yourself, instead:

  1. Get a lifeguard or call 911.
  2. Yell instructions.
  3. And if possible, throw a life preserver or floatation device.

These things may help you save a life.

The ocean can be a source of fun and excitement, but you should always be careful of hazards that exist. Only swim at lifeguard protected beaches. Before your next trip to the beach, know how to spot a rip current and how to break the grip of the rip.

Source: Ocean Today (NOAA)

Lifeguard Tower Posted with Safety Signs

Lifeguard Tower with Posted Rip Current Safety Signs

Please take a look at these very helpful links:

“Don’t get sucked in by the rip…” Rip Current Science and Safety Video: Australia

The Grip of the Rip – NOAA Video

United States Lifesaving Association Rip Current Survival Guide

How Rip Currents Form

Have a safe day at the beach!

This week’s WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge topic is Escape.

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Posted in Beach Safety Tips, Tallies & Tips | Tagged: , , , , , , | 6 Comments »

 
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