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Posts Tagged ‘Oregon Coast beachcombing’

“Finders Keepers!” in Lincoln City, Oregon

Posted by Jody on October 11, 2012

Finders Keepers! There are a lot of different treasures to find on the beaches of Lincoln City, Oregon! With 7 ½ miles of sandy public beaches, you may find beach treasures like agates, seashells, sea glass or drift wood while combing  Lincoln City’s seashore. If you’re really, really lucky, you may even find a rare glass Japanese fishing float along this sandy coastline. In days past, these hollow glass floats were used by Japanese fishermen to float their nets. (Alas, the traditional glass float has since been replaced by aluminum, Styrofoam, and plastic fishing floats.)

Glass Fishing Floats, Northern Japan (Photo by Jgrimmer/Wikimedia Commons)

Here’s one more great thing about beachcombing in Lincoln City, Oregon: From Mid-October to Memorial Day, beachcombers might find brand-new glass art floats. These colorful floats are gorgeous pieces of hand-crafted art that have been signed and numbered by the glassblower!

On October 20th (2012), the good people of Lincoln City will kick off their annual Glass Floats Finders Keepers Event. Hidden on the beach by Lincoln City’s volunteer “Float Fairies”, this year’s first weekend opens with the placement of  these beautiful beach treasures somewhere between the sands above the tide line and below the beach embankment – never in or on the cliffs.  According to the Lincoln City Visitor’s Guide: “Finders Keepers is an annual promotion, which runs from Mid-October to Memorial Day. More than 2,000 hand-crafted glass floats are placed along the 7-1/2 miles (12 km) of public beach in Lincoln City each year, from the Roads End area to the Cutler City area, some each day if the ocean and weather permit. You find it, you keep it!”  Now there’s a collector’s item any beachcomber would be proud to display!

Lincoln City, Oregon

Greg and I have had the pleasure of visiting the beaches of Lincoln City in the winter months, during the Finders Keepers Event.  Sadly, I must report that we have not found one of these precious treasures.  But, you can always buy a souvenir blown glass float in one of Lincoln City’s wonderful art galleries. The Lincoln City Visitor Center has special monthly drawings for glass floats, too. And there’s one more way to take home that special glass float! You can actually blow your own glass float in town. In the glass art studios of Lincoln City, you can buy a piece of glass art, watch the glass artists work, or have them teach you the art of glass blowing! There’s even a Glass Art Guide brochure available online.

Check out the Oregon.com website for the history of the Lincoln City Finders Keepers Event and for more information on where and when to search for these wonderful beach treasures.

Roads End Beach, Lincoln City, Oregon

Good luck & have a great day at the beach!  ~Don’t forget to share your finds with us!~

Do you know of a beach with a unique beachcombing event? How about a kite flying festival or sand castle competition? We’d love to hear about it!

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Pacific Coast Beaches | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Beach Lovers’ Paradise of the Pacific Northwest, Cannon Beach, Oregon

Posted by Jody on March 19, 2012

Looking South to Cannon Beach, Oregon

Even if you’ve never been to Cannon Beach, Oregon, I’d be mighty surprised if you haven’t at least seen a picture or two of its celebrated landmark Haystack Rock. Haystack Rock, towering 235 feet above the beach, together with the Needles (two tall rocks jutting straight out of the surf nearby), form every beach photographer’s dream shot. This famous monolith and its rocky companions showcase the rugged beauty of  northern Oregon’s Pacific coastline and add even more natural beauty to an already perfect strand.

Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach, Oregon

Tidepoolers and birdwatchers are drawn to Cannon Beach for the amazing variety this seashore offers. According to the City of Cannon Beach,  “The rocky reefs of Haystack Rock and the neighboring Needles have abundant and rich intertidal life. Tidepoolers are drawn to its wonders every day. As many as 200,000 people visit Haystack Rock every year, mostly during the summer months when the tidepools are teeming and the nesting seabirds, proudly showing off breeding plumage, are busy introducing little ones into the world.”

Even without Haystack Rock, the beach’s fine, golden sand would be enough of a draw for any beach lover. This is one beautiful stretch of sandy shoreline. Cannon Beach delights barefoot beachcombers, energetic dogs, and sand castle architects alike. In fact, Cannon Beach will host its 48th Annual Sand Castle Contest on June 9th, 2012!

Kristie and Liam beachcombing at Cannon Beach, Oregon ~ What will you find?

A beachcomber’s playground, agates, seashells, and driftwood can all be found on Cannon Beach.  The Cannon Beach Chamber of Commerce poetically states:  “Wave after wave, tide after tide, storm after storm, an oft playful but occasionally serious ocean continues its endlessly fascinating performance. Countless shells, semiprecious agates and twisted pieces of driftwood go through nature’s rock tumbling process in preparation for discovery.”

Tidepooling, beachcombing, birdwatching and castle building. Mist or shine, Cannon Beach is the beach lovers’ paradise of the Pacific Northwest.

* Remember: the Pacific Northwest Coast offers beautiful views but it can also surprise with dangerous conditions.  You’ll want to check out Oregon’s Coastal Quirks for beach safety tips and information.

Feel free to leave a comment & please share us with your friends. Don’t forget to Like us on Facebook at One Shell of a Find! Thanks ~ and have a great day at the beach!

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Posted in Monday Miscellaneous, Pacific Coast Beaches, Tide Pools | Tagged: , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

Oregon’s Official State Seashell, The Oregon Hairy Triton

Posted by Jody on December 29, 2011

Oregon’s State Seashell is the Fusitriton oregonensis, commonly referred to as the Oregon Hairy Triton.  It was named in the late 1840’s by conchologist (shell expert) John Howard Redfield after the Oregon Territory. The Oregon Legislature declared the Oregon Hairy Triton the Official State Seashell in 1991.

Oregon Hairy Triton (Photo by Ed Bierman/Wikimedia Commons)

The Oregon Hairy Triton is rather wide ranging. This large predatory sea snail is known to  inhabit the waters of Alaska’s Pribilof Islands in the Bearing Sea, south along the Pacific coast of the United States to San Diego, California.  The Fusitriton orgonesis can also be found in Northern Japan.

Also known simply as the Oregon Triton, this sturdy-shelled sea snail can be found on sand and loose fragments of rock, from the low tide zone to depths of 400 feet, often washing up on the beach at high tide. One of the largest seashells found along the Oregon coast,  look for them to be 3 – 5 inches in length.

Why is it called hairy? Its light brown shell is covered with gray-brown bristles called periostracum.

Do you have a favorite Oregon coast beach treasure?  We’d love to hear about it!

Happy beachcombing !

Posted in Beach Treasures - Beachcombing, Pacific Coast Beaches, Seashells | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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