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Posts Tagged ‘Oregon Coast lighthouse’

It’s National Lighthouse Day!

Posted by Jody on August 7, 2014

Yaquina Bay Lighthouse, Newport, Oregon

I can think of no other edifice constructed by man as altruistic as a lighthouse.

They were built only to serve. They weren’t built for any other purpose…

~ George Bernard Shaw

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Inside the Light Station

Inside the Lighthouse

It’s not at all a scary climb in this historic lighthouse!

The View from Yaquina Bay Lighthouse

Yaquina Bay Lighthouse View

Here’s a look at the lovely view from the Yaquina Bay Lighthouse to the sandy beaches below.

“A piece of Oregon history sits atop a bluff at the mouth of the Yaquina River. It is the Historic Yaquina Bay Lighthouse, built in 1871 and decommissioned in 1874. It was officially restored as a privately maintained aid to navigation on December 7, 1996. It is believed to be the oldest structure in Newport. It is also the only existing Oregon lighthouse with the living quarters attached, and the only historic wooden Oregon lighthouse still standing.” Source: Friends of Yaquina Lighthouses

Helpful links: American Lighthouse Foundation

The Association of Lighthouse Keepers

The United States Lighthouse Society

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Posted in Lighthouses | Tagged: , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Honoring Memorial Day USA

Posted by Jody on May 26, 2013

“How important it is for us to recognize and celebrate our heroes and she-roes!”

~ Maya Angelou

Yaquina Bay Lighthouse, Oregon Coast

Yaquina Bay State Recreation Site, Oregon Coast

The Yaquina Bay State Recreation Site overlooks the mouth of Yaquina Bay and its entrance into the Pacific Ocean. The property was given to the state by the U. S. Lighthouse Service in 1934 and 1971. It is a spruce and pine forested bluff containing an historic lighthouse, later used as a lifeboat station. The lighthouse has been restored and is open to the public. The park originally was developed for day use in 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps. The old lighthouse at the harbor entrance was erected in 1871 but was discontinued in 1874 in favor of the Yaquina Head Lighthouse several miles to the north. The Yaquina River is named for the Indian tribe that traditionally occupied the drainage territory. The adjoining city of Newport is a busy fishing and commercial port, very popular with summer travelers. In 1988, a Yaquina Bay State Park cooperative association was created by agreement with the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Division. The group provides information for visitors and tours of the lighthouse.

Source: Oregon Parks and Recreation Department

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Posted in Lighthouses, Pacific Coast Beaches | Tagged: , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

Weekly Photo Challenge: Up

Posted by Jody on April 22, 2013

Looking up at the tallest lighthouse on the Oregon coast:

Yaqina Head Light, Newport, Oregon

Yaquina Head Lighthouse, Newport, Oregon

Gazing up 92 feet:

Yaquina Head Lighthouse

Yaquina Head Lighthouse, Newport, Oregon

Peering up inside the Yaquina Head Lighthouse tower – 114 stairs to the watch room:

Inside Yaquina Head Light

Inside Yaquina Head Lighthouse Tower

When the lighthouse was constructed in 1872, the children of lighthouse keepers and lighthouse visitors were not permitted to climb the 114 stairs in the tower to the watch room because the US Lighthouse Service feared they would trip and fall on the steep stairs or squeeze between the posts of the handrails. The Yaquina Head Lighthouse retains its historic stairs and handrails and thus the safety of children climbing the stairs is still a concern. Today, children must be at least 42 inches tall to climb the stairs of the tower. Additionally, adults must accompany and assist children ascending the lighthouse tower.

Source: Bureau of Land Management

I will vouch for that justifiable feeling of fear on the part of the US Lighthouse Service! On our last visit to this splendid lighthouse and the surrounding Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area, our 5 year old grandson was “tall enough” to climb the 114 stairs to the top of the tower. I confess to being the big sissy of the group. The little guy waited patiently with my understanding hubby and quizzical son-in-law as I whizzed by them to climb to the top and back by myself. My very prudent and proper “respect” for heights seems to quickly blossom into a full blown scardey-cattedness when I’m with little ones (I know I’m not alone in this*)!

Come on up!

Glancing up at the first order Fresnel lens, manufactured in Paris in 1868 by Barbier & Fenestres:

Yaquina Head Light

Yaquina Head Lighthouse Lens

About the light:

The light has been active since Head Keeper Fayette Crosby walked up the 114 steps, to light the wicks on the evening of August 20, 1873. At that time the oil burning fixed white light was displayed from sunset to sunrise. Today, the fully automated first order Fresnel lens runs on commercial power and flashes its unique pattern of 2 seconds on, 2 seconds off, 2 seconds on, 14 seconds off, 24 hours a day. The oil burning wicks have been replaced with a 1000 watt globe.

Source: Friends of Yaquina Lighthouses

A view from the top of Yaquina Head Lighthouse toward the beaches of the Oregon Coast

Looking north from the top of Yaquina Head Lighthouse toward the beautiful beaches of the Oregon Coast

It was a “Great Day for UP!”

*My case in point: The Coastal Path, 36c – Kingsdown to St Margarets at Cliffe

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WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Up

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Posted in Lighthouses, Monday Miscellaneous, Pacific Coast Beaches | Tagged: , , , , , , | 20 Comments »

The Monday Morning Blues

Posted by Jody on March 11, 2013

Cape Meres Lighthouse, Tillamook County, Oregon

Cape Meares Lighthouse, Tillamook County, Oregon

The Cape Meares Lighthouse was built in 1889. Commissioned on January 1, 1890, the tower is the shortest lighthouse on Oregon’s Pacific coast. It stands only 38 feet high! That’s because this beacon is situated on a headland that rises 200 feet above the ocean. It’s a bit of a drive from Tillamook to Cape Meares but it’s well worth the time. The views from the lighthouse are outstanding!

Cape Meares State Scenic Viewpoint is located 10 miles west of Tillamook, Oregon on the north end of the beautiful Three Capes Scenic Route. The park is open daily, throughout the year, from 7 am to dusk with no day use fee.  The trail head to the Big Spruce, Oregon’s largest Sitka Spruce, is located near the park entrance. Features within the park include Cape Meares Lighthouse, an informational kiosk, interesting viewpoints where visitors can view off-shore rocks for native birds and the annual whale migration, the Three Arch Rocks National Wildlife Refuge, nature trails, and the Octopus Tree, an Oregon Heritage Tree. A picnic area that can accommodate small groups is located adjacent to the parking area plus picnic tables are situated in the center of the parking circle. More information: Friends of Cape Meares Lighthouse & Wildlife Refuge

Another helpful link: Oregon State Parks

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Posted in Lighthouses, Monday Miscellaneous | Tagged: , , , , , | 8 Comments »

Weekend’s Rock!

Posted by Jody on January 19, 2013

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse

Tillamook Rock

Built on a rocky island 1.2 miles offshore of Tillamook Head, Tillamook Rock Lighthouse represents an engineering and construction feat that overcame great obstacles. From 1880 when the lamp was lit until 1957 when it was decommissioned, “Terrible Tilly” served the maritime industry. Five keepers attended the lighthouse: four on duty at the lighthouse and one onshore on leave. No families lived at the lighthouse. Rotations were every three weeks for that’s when a boat returned the man on leave and brought provisions and mail. Because of the danger and isolation, these lighthouse keepers were paid more. Giant waves battered the lighthouse often shattering the protective glass around the light. During a storm in 1896, a rock weighing 135 pounds crashed through the roof and into the kitchen of the keeper’s quarters. After decommissioning, the lighthouse was abandoned for two decades. Under private ownership in 1980, the lighthouse was renovated and converted to a columbarium cemetery. Since 1994, the rocky islet has also been designated a federal wildlife refuge filled with nesting common murres and cormorants. The lighthouse can be seen from Ecola State Park and from Highway 101 south of Cannon Beach. It is not open to the public.

Source: Oregon Coast Visitors Association

Don't forget your binoculars! ~Ecola State Park, Oregon

Ecola State Park, Oregon

Don’t forget your binoculars! 

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, Oregon Coast

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, Oregon Coast

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Lighthouse trivia: Today, Tillamook Rock Lighthouse serves as a columbarium. A columbarium is a vault, building, or room with niches for storing urns containing ashes of the deceased. This site no longer accepts new urns.

Here are a couple of interesting related links: Oregon History Project, Seaside, Oregon

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Posted in Lighthouses, Pacific Coast Beaches, Weekend's Rock | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 22 Comments »

Travel Theme: White

Posted by Jody on September 26, 2012

Yaquina Head Lighthouse, Newport, Oregon

We are told to let our light shine, and if it does, we won’t need to tell anybody it does.

Lighthouses don’t fire cannons to call attention to their shining – they just shine.

~Dwight Lyman Moody (1837-1899), American evangelist and publisher

In observance of the International Day of Peace (Friday September 21st), blogger Ailsa of  Where’s my backpack? chose “White” for this week’s travel theme.

Posted in Lighthouses, Today's Special | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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