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Posts Tagged ‘Weekly Photo Challenge’

Weekly Photo Challenge: Up

Posted by Jody on April 22, 2013

Looking up at the tallest lighthouse on the Oregon coast:

Yaqina Head Light, Newport, Oregon

Yaquina Head Lighthouse, Newport, Oregon

Gazing up 92 feet:

Yaquina Head Lighthouse

Yaquina Head Lighthouse, Newport, Oregon

Peering up inside the Yaquina Head Lighthouse tower – 114 stairs to the watch room:

Inside Yaquina Head Light

Inside Yaquina Head Lighthouse Tower

When the lighthouse was constructed in 1872, the children of lighthouse keepers and lighthouse visitors were not permitted to climb the 114 stairs in the tower to the watch room because the US Lighthouse Service feared they would trip and fall on the steep stairs or squeeze between the posts of the handrails. The Yaquina Head Lighthouse retains its historic stairs and handrails and thus the safety of children climbing the stairs is still a concern. Today, children must be at least 42 inches tall to climb the stairs of the tower. Additionally, adults must accompany and assist children ascending the lighthouse tower.

Source: Bureau of Land Management

I will vouch for that justifiable feeling of fear on the part of the US Lighthouse Service! On our last visit to this splendid lighthouse and the surrounding Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area, our 5 year old grandson was “tall enough” to climb the 114 stairs to the top of the tower. I confess to being the big sissy of the group. The little guy waited patiently with my understanding hubby and quizzical son-in-law as I whizzed by them to climb to the top and back by myself. My very prudent and proper “respect” for heights seems to quickly blossom into a full blown scardey-cattedness when I’m with little ones (I know I’m not alone in this*)!

Come on up!

Glancing up at the first order Fresnel lens, manufactured in Paris in 1868 by Barbier & Fenestres:

Yaquina Head Light

Yaquina Head Lighthouse Lens

About the light:

The light has been active since Head Keeper Fayette Crosby walked up the 114 steps, to light the wicks on the evening of August 20, 1873. At that time the oil burning fixed white light was displayed from sunset to sunrise. Today, the fully automated first order Fresnel lens runs on commercial power and flashes its unique pattern of 2 seconds on, 2 seconds off, 2 seconds on, 14 seconds off, 24 hours a day. The oil burning wicks have been replaced with a 1000 watt globe.

Source: Friends of Yaquina Lighthouses

A view from the top of Yaquina Head Lighthouse toward the beaches of the Oregon Coast

Looking north from the top of Yaquina Head Lighthouse toward the beautiful beaches of the Oregon Coast

It was a “Great Day for UP!”

*My case in point: The Coastal Path, 36c – Kingsdown to St Margarets at Cliffe

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WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Up

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Posted in Lighthouses, Monday Miscellaneous, Pacific Coast Beaches | Tagged: , , , , , , | 20 Comments »

Weekly Photo Challenge: Color

Posted by Jody on April 5, 2013

Color ~ The Old Point Loma Lighthouse Lens

Color ~ The Old Point Loma Lighthouse Lens

The Old Point Loma Lighthouse – Illuminating the Past

The Old Point Loma Lighthouse stood watch over the entrance to San Diego Bay for 36 years. At dusk on November 15, 1855, the light keeper climbed the winding stairs and lit the light for the first time. What seemed to be a good location 422 feet above sea level, however, had a serious flaw. Fog and low clouds often obscured the light. On March 23, 1891, the light was extinguished and the keeper moved to a new lighthouse location closer to the water at the tip of the Point.

Old Point Loma Lighthouse at Cabrillo National Monument, San Diego, California

Old Point Loma Lighthouse at Cabrillo National Monument, San Diego, California

Today, the Old Point Loma Lighthouse still stands watch over San Diego, sentinel to a vanished past. The National Park Service has refurbished the interior to its historic 1880s appearance – a reminder of a bygone era. Ranger-led talks, displays, and brochures are available to explain the lighthouse’s interesting past.

Source: National Park Service

About the light: The original Old Point Loma lighthouse lens was hand crafted by Frenchman Henry-Lepaute. His beautiful master work was constructed with polished brass and several hundred hand-ground crystal prisms. Classified as a 3rd Order Fresnel lens, and weighing in at 1985 pounds, the light measures 5’2″ in height. When in operation, the beacon could be seen from more than 20 miles out to sea.

The beautifully maintained Old Point Loma Lighthouse is still quite a lovely sight to see!

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Related link: A Visit to the Tide Pools at Cabrillo National Monument

WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Color

Posted in Lighthouses | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 9 Comments »

For Oona

Posted by Jody on March 24, 2013

Happy Birthday to You!

Happy Birthday to You!

The greatest poem ever known
Is one all poets have outgrown:
The poetry, innate, untold,
Of being only four years old.

Still young enough to be a part
Of Nature’s great impulsive heart,
Born comrade of bird, beast, and tree
And unselfconscious as the bee-

And yet with lovely reason skilled
Each day new paradise to build;
Elate explorer of each sense,
Without dismay, without pretense!

~Christopher Morley, To a Child
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WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Future Tense

Christopher Morley Knothole Association

Posted in Today's Special | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments »

Weekly Photo Challenge: Forward

Posted by Jody on February 22, 2013

I’ll race you!

 Perfect Morning in Bandon, Oregon

A Perfect Morning in Bandon, Oregon

Weekly Photo Challenge: Forward

More about Bandon’s beautiful beach: Travel Theme: Animals – Tidepooling in Bandon, Oregon

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Posted in Pacific Coast Beaches, Today's Special | Tagged: , , , , , | 60 Comments »

Weekend’s Rock!

Posted by Jody on February 9, 2013

~Home Sweet Home~

Cabrillo National Monument, San Diego, California

Cabrillo National Monument, San Diego, California

Take a closer look! You’ll find that this beautiful Southern California tide pool environment is home to numerous species of marine life. Sea anemones, gooseneck barnacles, California mussles, and black tegulas (among many others) all live here in the rocky intertidal zone of Cabrillo National Monument.

Black Tegulas (Tegula funebralis)

~A Rocky Bungalow~
Black Tegulas (Tegula funebralis)

Black Tegulas (Tegula funebralis) are extremely common finds along the Pacific coast of the United States.  Also known as Black Turbans, they live along the shoreline and rocks of the upper and middle intertidal zones from Vancouver Island, British Columbia to the central Baja California peninsula. These little beauties are often found packed tightly into neat and tidy clusters on rocky surfaces and in crevices.

Would you  like to know more about tidepooling in Southern California?  Here are a few helpful links:

Tide Pool Etiquette 101

A Visit to the Tide Pools at Cabrillo National Monument, San Diego, California

Picture Perfect La Jolla Cove and Beach, Southern California

WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Home

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Posted in Southern California Beaches, Tide Pools, Weekend's Rock | Tagged: , , , , , , | 20 Comments »

Weekly Photo Challenge: Unique

Posted by Jody on February 5, 2013

Common Fig (Ficus communis)

Common Fig (Ficus communis)

“Don’t compare yourself with anyone in this world… if you do so, you are insulting yourself.”

~Bill Gates, Microsoft Co-founder 

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Related post: This Common Fig Doesn’t Grow on Trees

WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Unique

Posted in Seashells, Today's Special | Tagged: , , , , , | 8 Comments »

“Baby, it’s cold outside!”

Posted by Jody on January 21, 2013

A Rainy Day in Manhattan Beach, California

A Rainy Day in Manhattan Beach, California

“Baby, it’s cold outside!”

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Since I couldn’t decide which category this photo fit into best, it’s my entry for both!

WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Beyond

&

A Word A Week Photo Challenge – Weather

Which Photo Challenge theme would you have chosen for this snapshot of a young couple, all snuggled up together, on a rainy day at Manhattan Beach Pier? Beyond or Weather?

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Posted in Southern California Beaches, Today's Special | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 17 Comments »

Weekly Photo Challenge: Illumination

Posted by Jody on January 12, 2013

Sunset Illumination at Bandon Beach, Oregon

Sunset Illumination at Bandon,  Oregon

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that.

Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.”

~Martin Luther King Jr.

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WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Illumination

Posted in Pacific Coast Beaches, Today's Special, Weekend's Rock | Tagged: , , , , , , | 34 Comments »

Weekly Photo Challenge: Delicate

Posted by Jody on December 14, 2012

Delicate Coastal Sand Dunes

Delicate Coastal Sand Dunes

What threatens coastal sand dunes?

Coastal sand dune systems are highly vulnerable to disturbance by trampling. Pedestrians and motor vehicles can compact the sand and crush vegetation; for example, Native Dune Grass dies when its roots are crushed. Without the stabilizing vegetation, the sand is blown away and dunes disappear. This can leave the shoreline more prone to damage from storm surges.

Invasive species are a major concern for the ecology of sand dunes. Scotch Broom and European Beachgrass are two common examples. Because they are not native to the region, they often have no natural predators or other controls. Therefore, invasive species can create dense monocultures that crowd out other species. As they did not evolve along with all the other species in the area, they provide limited habitat values. Some invasive species are so well-established that their eradication is not feasible without substantial cost and effort.

Sand dunes can be destroyed when structures are built too close to the shoreline. As the coastline naturally erodes, these structures become threatened, and people often respond by building “protective” reinforcements such as seawalls. This can further degrade the beach habitat, and even distant seawalls can starve downdrift beaches of sediment (see also coastal sediment processes and altered shorelines).

Dune habitats are often affected by alteration of shorelines in other areas. For example, bluffs composed of glacial till provide sediment that is eroded by waves and transported by longshore currents to the sand dune beach, where it is deposited. If the bluffs are armoured to prevent erosion, with cement or rock, this sediment supply is cut off and the beach is gradually depleted of sand.

How can I help protect coastal sand dunes?

When walking on beaches with sand dunes, try to stay on the seaward side of the dunes, where the sand has been compacted by the tides. Stay on marked or established trails or boardwalks, when walking through dune vegetation, and observe signs.

Keep dogs under control and don’t let them dig in dunes or chase wildlife.

Plant native vegetation along your shoreline property, to help prevent erosion and increase wildlife habitat. Learn about other options for reducing erosion that use natural shoreline development techniques instead of hard structures.

Leave driftwood in place, rather than “cleaning up” the beach. Logs help to stabilize sand dunes, and provide hiding places for wildlife.

Get involved with a local community stewardship group that works to protect and restore sand dunes.

See other tips to help protect shorelines in general.

(Source: Capital Regional District)

We can all make a difference when it comes to the protection and preservation of our delicate coastal sand dune ecosystems. One for all and all for fun!

Have a great day at the beach!

This week’s WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge theme is “Delicate.”

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Posted in Beach and Coastal Wildlife, Sand and Shoreline | Tagged: , , , , | 9 Comments »

Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons

Posted by Jody on December 10, 2012

Seems it never rains in southern California
Seems I’ve often heard that kind of talk before

~It Never Rains in Southern California, Lyrics by Albert Hammond

Yes, it rains in Southern California!

December day on Manhattan Beach

I beg to differ…

This week’s WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge theme is “Changing Seasons.”

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Posted in Southern California Beaches, Today's Special | Tagged: , , , , , | 14 Comments »

 
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